Sketch of Maj. Gen'l Joseph Cilley, of Nottingham, N.H.,

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Thomas H. Tuson, printer, 1891 - 13 pages
 

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Page 7 - ... was a strict disciplinarian, his constant unremitted attention to the comfort and care of his soldiers, secured him their confidence and esteem. He was with the northern army, and fought bravely in the actions of the 19th of September and of the 7th of October 1777.
Page 7 - And on the igth of June, 1781, the legislature appointed him a commissioner in behalf of New Hampshire, to repair to Rhode Island on the 25th of that month, to meet such commissioners as might be appointed by the other New England states, to...
Page 5 - ... of Capt. Joseph and Alice (Rawlins) Cilley. When a young man he practised law in his native place. On Nov. 4, 1756, he was married to Sarah, daughter of Jonathan and Mary (Clark) Longfellow. In 1758 he enlisted as a private in Major Rogers's battalion of rangers, marched to the northern frontiers in Canada, and was then appointed a sergeant. He continued in the service for more than a year. In Decamber, 1774, he aided in stripping the fort at Portsmouth of its equipments. The following year he...
Page 6 - ... refinement of judicial proceedings. In the militia he gradually rose from the rank of a soldier to that of an officer ; and before the Revolution had a captain's commission under the royal government. In 1774, when the political controversy between this country and Great Britain ran high, he publicly and zealously espoused the cause of his country ; and in the close of this and the beginning of the succeeding year, before the British had actually commenced hostility, but after it was reduced...
Page 11 - ... was on all occasions open, frank, and explicit in avowing his sentiments ; there was no vice he so much abhorred and detested as hypocrisy. His passions were too strong to be deceitful ; he despised and contemned the artful,, cool, designing knave. He was manly and liberal — incapable of meanness : and though his manners were not those of a courtier, they were easy, plain and correct. Neither the ties of friendship or consanguinity, tho' he felt their force, could restrain him from aiding those...
Page 7 - ... of April, 1775, he marched at the head of one hundred volunteers to head quarters at Cambridge, and promptly tendered his services to his country. He was appointed lieutenant colonel in the Revolutionary army ; and in April, 1777, colonel of a regiment, and held the command during the war. Tho...
Page 5 - ... manhood, he had acquired only so much learning as to read a common book, write a legible hand, and understand the three or four first and most useful rules in arithmetic. In his early days he had little time or inclination for study, indeed he never in life read much, except the journals of the days and the statute laws of the province and state.
Page 11 - ... offices, in preference to men of his own party, on the principle that the former were best qualified. He was a man of good judgment, a lively imagination, and of great decision of character. His passions were strong and irritable, his expressions quick and hasty ; but he was humane and tenderhearted. He was, on all occasions, open, frank, and explicit in avowing his sentiments ; there was no vice he so much abhorred and detested as hypocrisy. His passions were too strong to be deceitful ; he...
Page 6 - ... he early discovered a much stronger disposition for the military than the civil life. Arms had more powerful attractions to him than the subtlety and refinement of judicial proceedings. In the militia he gradually rose from the rank of a soldier to that of an officer ; and before the Revolution had a captain's commission under the royal government. In 1774, when the political controversy between this country and Great Britain ran high, he publicly and zealously espoused the cause of his country...

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