Skyscrapers: A Social History of the Very Tall Building in America

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McFarland, Jan 1, 2004 - History - 280 pages
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This history of skyscrapers examines how these tall buildings affected the cityscape and the people who worked in, lived in, and visited them. Much of the focus is rightly on the architects who had the vision to design and build America's skyscrapers, but attention is also given to the steelworkers who built them, the financiers who put up the money, and the daredevils who attempt to "conquer" them in some inexplicable pursuit of fame. The impact of the skyscraper on popular culture, particularly film and literature, is also explored.
 

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Contents

Skyscraper Panorama
1
Looking for a Way Upward
7
A New Genius for Building Tall
20
Timid New York Grows Bold
34
Mr Woolworth Builds His Shrine
50
Of Lights Elevators and Water That Runs to the Sky
61
The Great Tribune Competition
71
The 1920s
83
The Human Spider and Other Fancies of the Silver Screen
150
A View from the Deck
163
Skyscrapers Go Modern
175
Chicago Catches Up at Last
194
The World Trade Towers
204
Climbers and DaredevilsThe Old and the New
212
The Sears Tower
222
American Skyline
228

The One and Only Empire State Building
107
Those Who Work on High
117
A Festival of Skyscrapers
128
Of Zeppelins Airplanes and Things That Come from the Sky
139
Bibliography
249
Index
261
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About the author (2004)

George H. Douglas, a retired English professor, has written a number of books about American people and places. He is the author of The Early Days of Radio Broadcasting (2001), and lives in Champaign, Illinois.

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