Slaves in the New Testament: Literary, Social, and Moral Dimensions

Front Cover
Fortress Press, 2010 - Religion - 322 pages
1 Review
In this exciting new analysis of slaves and slavery in the New Testament, Harrill breaks new ground with his extensive use of Greco-Roman evidence, discussion of hermeneutics, and treatment of the use of the New Testament in antebellum U.S. slavery debates. He examines in detail Philemon, 1 Corinthians, Romans, Luke-Acts, and the household codes.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

He demonstrates the difficulty, if not futility, in appealing to the Bible, especially its literalistic "plain sense," to settle complex moral debates. With respect to slavery, as far as he goes Harrill brilliantly elucidates the New Testament's basic complicity in the dominant ancient literary and rhetorical ethos of its day--and thus its limited ethical value for today. Review in Biblical Theology Bulletin, Winter, 2006 by F. Scott Spencer  

Contents

The Slave Self
19
SpeechinCharacter and the Slave Persona
20
The Slave as Automaton and the Art of Authority
23
Romans 7 and the Slave Self
28
Conclusion
32
The Slave Body
37
The Physiognomies of the Naturally Slavish Body
39
Invective and the Greek and Roman Rhetoric of Manhood
47
Slave Dealers and Sexual Immorality
131
Slave Dealers and Violation of Holiness
135
Slave Dealers and Violation of Jewish Law
138
10 and the Vice of Slave Dealers
141
The Domestic Enemy
147
A Case of Mastercide
149
Slave Autopsy in Early Christian Apology
155
The Slave Body as Spectacle in Early Christian Martyrdom
159

CynicSocratic Apologia and Paul at War
55
The Comedy of Slavery in Story and Parable
61
18
68
Conclusion
85
Subordinate to Another
87
Colossians and Ephesians the Epistle of Barnabas the Didache and the Doctrina Apostolorum
89
The Ancient Handbook Tradition
99
Justice Accountability and Piety
105
Early Christian Household Codes as Handbooks
115
The Vice of the Slave Trader
121
Lawlessness of Slave Dealers in Acquiring Merchandise
126
Untrustworthiness of Slave Dealers in Selling Merchandise
127
The Use of the New Testament in the American Slave Controversy
167
AntislaveryAbolitionist Theology and Exegesis
168
The Voices of African Americans
179
Proslavery Theology and Exegesis
182
Conclusion
193
Epilogue
195
Abbriviation
199
Notes
203
Works Cited
273
Index of Names and Subjects
315
Index of Biblical and Other Ancient Sources
318
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 21 - For I delight in the law of God, in my inmost self, but I see in my members another law at war with the law of my mind and making me captive to the law of sin which dwells in my members.
Page 30 - We know that our old self was crucified with him so that the body of sin might be destroyed, and we might no longer be enslaved to sin.
Page 16 - Perhaps this is why he was parted from you for a while, that you might have him back for ever, no longer as a slave but more than a slave, as a beloved brother, especially to me but how much more to you, both in the flesh and in the Lord.
Page 27 - Then you ought to have invested my money with the bankers, and at my coming I should have received what was my own with interest. So take the talent from him and give it to him who has the ten talents.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2010)

J. Albert Harrill is Professor of History and Classics at The Ohio State University. He is the author of Paul the Apostle: His Life and Legacy in Their Roman Context (Cambridge, 2012), Slaves in the New Testament: Literary, Social, and Moral Dimensions (Fortress Press, 2006) and The Manumission of Slaves in Early Christianity (Tübingen, 1995). He has also contributed to numerous reference works on the Bible and Christianity, and his articles have appeared in such journals as the Journal of Early Christian Studies, Journal of Biblical Literature, New Testament Studies, Novum Testamentum, and Religion and American Culture.

Bibliographic information