Sloyd

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Sloyd Training School, 1902 - Sloyd - 75 pages
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Contents

I
9
II
19
III
27
IV
35
V
39

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Page 66 - The most colossal improvement which recent years have seen in secondary education lies in the introduction of the manual training schools,— not because they will give us a people more handy and practical for domestic life and better skilled in trades, but because they will give us citizens with an entirely different intellectual fibre.
Page 12 - I have thus far attempted to show how the will can be made strong. But a strong will is not necessarily a good will. It is true there are influences in manual training, as it has been described, which are favorable to a virtuous disposition. Squareness in things is not without relation to squareness in action and thinking.
Page 48 - the soil, the length of the day, the wants of the people, the habit and form of government," then, I would say, the purpose of education will be fulfilled. Do not think, however, that I do not
Page 16 - 1. The series must progress without break from the easy to the difficult, from the simple to the complex. 2. There must be a
Page 11 - stupidity, and irresolution which we encounter in the world, and even in highly educated men and women, is dependent on defective or misdirected muscular training, and that the thoughtful and diligent cultivation of this is conducive to breadth of mind as well as to breadth of shoulders.
Page 12 - that has once acquired, in connection with the making of a box, the habits just described, has mastered the secret of a strong will, and will be able to apply the same habits in other directions and on other occasions.
Page 11 - Depend upon it that much of the confusion of thought, awkwardness, bashfulness, stutterings, stupidity, and irresolution which we encounter in the world, and even in highly educated men and women, is dependent on defective or misdirected muscular training, and that the thoughtful and diligent cultivation of this is conducive to breadth of mind as well as to breadth of shoulders.
Page 10 - worthless as a savage. The great secret of education is to make the exercises of the .body and of the spirit serve each to relieve the other.
Page 10 - For the beginning of knowledge is from pure sense, not from words; and truth and certitude are testified to by the evidence of the senses. The senses are the most faithful stewards of the memory.
Page 10 - Above all, never teach words without things, even in the vernacular; and whatever the pupils see, hear, taste, or touch, let them name. The tongue and the intelligence should advance on parallel lines.

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