So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish

Front Cover
Pan Macmillan, Sep 1, 2009 - Fiction
35 Reviews

So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish, with a foreword by Neil Gaiman, is the fourth instalment in Douglas Adams' bestselling Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy 'trilogy'.

Just as Arthur Dent's sense of reality is in its dickiest state he suddenly finds the girl of his dreams. He finds her in the last place in which he would expect to find anything at all, but which 3,976,000,000 people will find oddly familiar. They go in search of God's Final Message to His Creation and, in a dramatic break from tradition, actually find it.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AliceAnna - LibraryThing

I enjoyed the introduction to Fenchurch and her airborne dalliances with Arthur, but still not exactly gripping fare. I still haven't figured out the point -- maybe Adams was apologizing to me for my inconvenience and discomfort in reading this whole series. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - martensgirl - LibraryThing

I'm a bit undecided about this book. The previous book in the series was a bit annoying; I was getting a bit sick of the endless waffle about space and aliens. I appreciated the change on tone and pace of this book. Sadly, not much happens. Read full review

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About the author (2009)

Douglas Adams was born in 1952 and created all the various and contradictory manifestations of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy: radio, novels, TV, computer game, stage adaptation, comic book and bath towel.

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy was published in 1979 and its phenomenal success sent the book straight to Number One in the UK Bestseller List. His series has sold over 15 million books in the UK, the US and Australia and was also a bestseller in German, Swedish and many other languages.

He is also the author of the Dirk Gently novels: Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency, The Long Dark Tea Time of the Soul and the unfinished The Salmon of Doubt.

Douglas lived with his wife and daughter in California, where he died suddenly in 2001.

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