Soaps: A Practical Manual of the Manufacture of Domestic, Toilet and Other Soaps

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Scott, Greenwood & Son, 1907 - Soap - 385 pages
 

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Page 80 - ... its powers. It is not intended here to enter into a discussion of the need; the evidence that the disease is prevalent among dogs in certain parts of California is sufficient to convince any tribunal within the borders of this State. Nor is it our intention to express an opinion as to whether it is better to legislate for the convenience of dogs or for the lives of children...
Page 348 - If the soap contains much coco-nut oil, the results obtained in determining the amount of fatty matter by either of the methods given will be too low, owing to the oil containing fatty acids which are soluble in water, and which pass into the wash, waters, and so are not collected and weighed. Mr. JA Wilson recommends the following process : — 10 grammes of the soap are dissolved in water and decomposed by a slight excess of dilute sulphuric acid ; the glass or flask containing the soap mass is...
Page 67 - It also serves as a store of warmth for the body and as a store of food. 2. VEGETABLE OILS AND FATS. In the vegetable kingdom oils and fats occur in a variety of ways. All seeds contain oil to a greater or less extent, some as much as 60 per cent. This oil acts as a food for the young plant until it reaches such a period of its growth that it can extract its sustenance from the earth. The pulp of certain fruits, eg, olives, oil-palm nuts, contains a good deal of oil.
Page 118 - This parallel end fits the hole made by the tap drill, so that by the exercise of a little care on the part of the user a squarely tapped hole is the result. The other sort, Fig.
Page 318 - Glycerine is also soluble in alcohol, but only slightly so in ether. A mixture of equal volumes of chloroform and alcohol dissolves it, but it is insoluble in chloroform, benzine, petroleum spirit, and oils. It is a powerful solvent for salts, etc., being nearly equal to water in this respect. It is composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen in the proportions indicated by the formula...
Page iii - Lubricating Oils, Fats and Greases: Their Origin, Preparation, Properties, Uses and Analysis. 313 pages, with 65 illustrations. 8vo, cloth net, $3 . 00 Soaps. A Practical Manual of the Manufacture of Domestic, Toilet and other Soaps. Illustrated with 66 engravings. 8vo, cloth net, $5 . 00 Textile Soaps and Oils...
Page 336 - ... then weigh it. Next replace it in the oven for about an hour, again allow to cool, and weigh it ; repeat these operations until there is no further loss of weight. The loss of weight may be taken as water, although, if in transparent soaps, a little of the spirit be left in, and this will also be volatilised and reckoned with the water. To take an example — Grms. "Weight of basin + soap . . . 35-368 Weight of basin 25-368 Weight of soap taken . . . 10-000 Weight of soap and basin (B) . . 35-368...
Page 53 - CaC03 together by dissolving in an excess of standard hydrochloric acid and titrating back with standard alkali. By deducting the CaO estimated as in No. 1 the quantity of CaCO3 is obtained.
Page 264 - ... 2. Improvement in quality ; 3. Increased quantity ; 4. Economy in labour ; 5. Saving in fuel ; 6. The use of cheaper materials ; 7. Saponification of all the grease ; 8. Saving of the glycerine, which enters into the soap. The following description of the process is given in Dussauce's Treatise. " Their process consists in agitating the saponifiable materials with caustic or carbonated alkalies in solution in water in a closed vessel, while under heat and pressure, in such a manner as to cause...
Page 264 - ... fats with the alkaline solution, and producing an instantaneous combination of the fatty acids with the base of the alkaline solution. We suppose a quantity of fatty matter enclosed in a vessel with a solution of carbonate of soda in water, and heat applied to produce a pressure of 220 to 280 Ibs. per square inch, and a temperature of 350 to 400 F., a combination between the fatty acids and the soda of the solution will take place only at the upper surface of the solution when in contact...

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