Soccer Against the Enemy: How the World's Most Popular Sport Starts and Fuels Revolutions and Keeps Dictators in Power

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Nation Books, Apr 27, 2010 - Sports & Recreation - 320 pages
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Soccer is much more than just the most popular game in the world. It is a matter of life and death for millions around the world, an international lingua franca. Simon Kuper traveled to twenty-two countries to discover the sometimes bizarre effect soccer can have on politics and culture. At the same time he tried to discover what makes different countries play a simple game so differently. Kuper meets a remarkable variety of fans along the way, from the East Berliner persecuted by the Stasi for supporting his local team, to the Argentine general with his own views on tactics. He also illuminates the frightening intersection between soccer and politics, particularly in the wake of the attacks of 9-11, where soccer is obsessed over by the likes of Osama bin Laden. The result is one of the world's most acclaimed books on the game, and an astonishing study of soccer and its place in the world.
 

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Review: Soccer Against the Enemy: How the World's Most Popular Sport Starts and Fuels Revolutions and Keeps Dictators in Power

User Review  - Scott - Goodreads

Brilliant historical comparison of Hitler's Germany and Stalin's Russia Read full review

Contents

CHAPTER 1
1
CHAPTER 2
4
CHAPTER 3
19
CHAPTER 4
32
CHAPTER 5
41
CHAPTER 6
62
CHAPTER 7
79
CHAPTER 8
84
CHAPTER 14
161
CHAPTER 15
189
CHAPTER 16
205
CHAPTER 17
237
CHAPTER 18
248
CHAPTER 19
267
CHAPTER 20
275
CHAPTER 21
285

CHAPTER 9
91
CHAPTER 10
101
CHAPTER 11
111
CHAPTER 12
119
CHAPTER 13
134
POSTSCRIPT
296
BIBLIOGRAPHY
301
INDEX
303
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Simon Kuper was born in Uganda in 1969. He has lived (and played and watched soccer) in Holland, Germany, the USA and England, and has written on soccer for publications all over the world, including the New York Times. He now works for the Financial Times. He studied history and German at Oxford University and supports Ajax Amsterdam, but not all that passionately.

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