Social Anxiety

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Guilford Press, Jun 1, 1997 - Psychology - 244 pages
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Social anxiety is an unavoidable part of everyday life. Whether experienced when speaking before large groups, in interactions with one's boss, when talking to potential romantic partners, during casual conversation, or when dealing with complete strangers, feelings of anxiety, uncertainty, and awkwardness are often the consequence of quite ordinary encounters. Social Anxiety provides a complete and authoritative review of the latest theory and research on this common problem. Following an introduction, chapters discuss the situational and dispositional factors that cause one to experience social anxiety and also explore the related phenomenon of embarrassment. The book examines individual differences in trait social anxiety and social phobia and features assessment scales for measuring Fear of Negative Evaluation, Blushing Propensity, and Social Physique Anxiety. The physiological, cognitive, and emotional aspects of social anxiety are then explored, as are behavioral manifestations. The final chapter of the book describes the current treatments being used for social anxiety, and then compares their efficacy. Throughout the text, the subject is brought to life through the use of highlighted side topics, such as social anxiety among celebrities, implications of social anxiety for student achievement, and the link between blue eyes and social anxiety. With its interdisciplinary and integrated approach to the subject, Social Anxiety will appeal to researchers and practitioners from a wide range of fields, including social and personality psychology, counseling, communication, and sociology. The book's accessibility and thoroughness make it an excellent text for undergraduate and graduatestudents in psychology and other behavioral sciences.
 

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social anxiety

Contents

The Stage Fright of Everyday Life
1
A Definition
4
The Experience of Social Anxiety
6
Types of Social Anxiety
8
Individual Differences
10
Behavioral Science and Social Anxiety
12
The Interpersonal Basis of Social Anxiety
15
SelfPresentation and Interpersonal Behavior
16
Is Social Phobia Extreme Social Anxiety?
103
Temperamental Underpinnings
104
The Development of Personality Predispositions
109
Susceptibility to Social Anxiety in Specific Contexts
115
Gender Differences
123
AgeRelated Changes
124
Subjective Aspects of Social Anxiety Physiology Cognition and Emotion
128
Physiological Arousal
129

The SelfPresentational Basis of Social Anxiety
19
The Evolutionary Basis of Social Anxiety
23
Implications of the SelfPresentational Approach
28
SelfPresentational Motivation
30
Impression Monitoring
31
The Value and Importance of Hopedfor Outcomes
37
SelfImage and SelfEsteem
42
Approval Seeking
45
SelfPresentational Expectancies
50
Appraisal of Interpersonal Load
52
Appraisal of SelfPresentational Resources
61
Biases in Assessment of SelfPresentational Efficacy
71
SelfPresentational Disasters
76
Predicaments
77
Embarrassment
82
Theories of Embarrassment
84
Embarrassability
88
Remedial Tactics
91
The Maladaptive Side of Embarrassment
93
The Importance of Embarrassment
99
Trait Social Anxiety and Social Phobia
101
Anxious Cognitions
133
Emotional Experience
136
Effects of Anxious Arousal and Though
141
Blushing
150
Interpersonal Behavior
156
Disaffiliation
157
SelfPresentation
165
Innocuous Sociability
169
Prosocial Behavior
171
Consequences of Disaffiliation
172
Chasing Away the Butterflies
179
Treatments for Social Anxiety
180
SelfPresentational Motivation
183
SelfPresentational Efficacy
185
Lowering Anxiety
191
Relative Effectiveness of Various Treatments
195
SelfHelp Approaches
199
A Concluding Comment
200
References
203
Index
239
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About the author (1997)

Mark R. Leary, PhD, is Professor of Psychology at Wake Forest University. His research interests focus on social motivation and emotion, particularly processes involving self-presentation, social anxiety, and self-esteem. The author of a number of books, he is also Associate Editor of the Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology.

Robin M. Kowalski, PhD, has taught at Wake Forest University and Western Carolina University, where she is currently Assistant Professor of Psychology. Her research interests include social anxiety, social psychological factors in health and illness, gender and aggression, and complaining. Her research on complaining has received national attention, including an appearance on NBC's Today Show.

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