Social Multi-Criteria Evaluation for a Sustainable Economy

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Springer Science & Business Media, Dec 22, 2007 - Business & Economics - 210 pages
The real world is characterized by deep complexity. May be a rather unremarkable observation, yet it has important implications on the manner policy problems are represented and decision-making is framed. Is contemporary democracy compatible with science in real-world policy-making? This book gives answers in the affirmative. It also asserts that this congruence can have positive implications not only in terms of economic prosperity but also when dealing with the difficult sustainability policy problems of our millennium. To address contemporary issues economic science will have to expand its empirical relevance by introducing more and more realistic assumptions to its models. One of the most interesting research orientations in recent times in the field of public economics is the explicit attempt to take account of political constraints, interest groups and collusion effects. One of the main novelties of this book is its establishment of a clear relationship between social and public choice theories on one hand, and multiple criteria decision analysis on the other. The pioneering research developed by Arrow and Raynaud (1986) has shown that the relationships between multi-criteria decision theory and social choice are clear and relevant. The main directions of cross-fertilization between these research fields are twofold: 1. Multi-criteria decision theory can be an adequate framework for applied social (and public) choice. 2. Social choice can produce interesting theoretical results for ensuring the ax- matic consistency needed by multi-criterion aggregation conventions.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
12 Social MultiCriteria Evaluation
7
121 A LandUse Conflict in the Netherlands
8
122 Assessing Urban Sustainability
10
13 Social MultiCriteria Evaluation and Sustainability Issues
14
Dealing with a Complex World Multiple Dimensions Values and Scales
18
22 The Incommensurability Principle
23
23 Reductionism Must Be Avoided
24
57 Ideal and Reference Point Approaches
104
58 Conclusion
109
The Issue of Consistency Lessons Learned from Social Choice Literature
111
62 Borda Versus Condorcet
116
63 The Cycle Issue in Condorcet Consistent Rules
120
64 ArrowRaynauds Ranking Procedure
125
65 Discussion
127
Mathematical Procedures to Search for Technical and Social Compromise Solutions
130

The Fetishism of Fictitious Commodities
28
Operationalizing Technical and Social Incommensurability in an SMCE Framework
35
Social Incommensurability
37
33 Implementing the Ideal SMCE Process
45
34 Social MultiCriteria Evaluation as a Framework for Applying Public and Social Choice to RealWorld Problems
52
Consistency in Social MultiCriteria Evaluation
55
The Issue of Consistency Basic Methodological Concepts
57
42 Preference Modelling in SMCE
60
43 Quantitative Qualitative and Mixed Criterion Scores
62
432 Uncertainty in the Criterion Scores
64
433 Dealing with Mixed Information on the Criterion Scores
69
44 Compensability and the Meaning of Weights
71
45 The Use of Weights in an SMCE Framework
78
452 Weights and Social Incommensurability
82
46 Conclusion
84
The Issue of Consistency Basic Discrete MultiCriteria Methods
85
Outranking Methods
92
53 The PROMETHEE Methods
95
54 The REGIME Methods
97
55 The Analytic Hierarchy Process
99
56 The NAIADE Method
101
Searching for the Technical Compromise Solution Solving the Discrete MultiCriterion Problem in an SMCE Framework
133
The Case of Mixed Information on Criterion Scores
136
Introducing Weights as Importance Coefficients
139
74 Ranking of Alternatives in a Complete PreOrder
141
A Borda Approach
143
76 Numerical Examples
145
77 Conclusion
154
Appendix 71
157
Appendix 72
159
Appendix 73
161
Searching for the Social Compromise Solution A Conflict Analysis Procedure for Illuminating Distributional Issues
162
82 Do Similarities Exist Among Social Actors? A Fuzzy Cluster Analysis
164
83 Ranking Policy Options
170
84 Concluding Remarks
178
Appendix 81
179
Conclusions
181
A Sustainability Composite Indicator Based on MultiCriteria and Sensitivity Analysis
185
A2 Sensitivity Analysis
188
Bibliography and References
193
Index
207
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Page 2 - Heaven, we were all going direct the other way — in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.
Page 13 - The final solution is more like a "creation" than a discovery. In Multiple-Criteria Decision Aid (MCDA) (Roy, 1985), the principal aim is not to discover a solution, but to construct or create something which is viewed as liable to help "an actor taking part in a decision process either to shape, and/or to argue, and/or to transform his preferences, or to make a decision in conformity with his goals" (Roy, 1990) (constructive or creative approach).

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