Social History of the Races of Mankind ...

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Trübner & Company, 1889 - Civilization
 

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Page 448 - It is bounded on the North by the Arctic Ocean ; on the East by the Pacific Ocean ; on the South by the Indian Ocean ; and on the West by the Red Sea, the Mediterranean Sea, the Caspian Sea, and the Oural Mountains.
Page 370 - ... compressing machine, where it is kept for ten or twelve months; though the females remain longer than the boys. The operation is so gradual that it is not attended with pain; but the impression is deep and permanent. The heads of the children, when they are released from the bandage, are not more than two inches thick about the upper edge of the forehead, and still thinner above: nor with all its efforts can nature ever restore its shape, the heads of grown persons being often in a straight line...
Page vii - This species infests a great variety of plants, and is to be found throughout our country from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico and from the Atlantic to the Pacific.
Page 321 - Missouri, in its spring-time freshets, cuts down its banks and sweeps some tall tree into its current, it is said that the spirit of the tree cries while the roots yet cling to the land and until the tree falls into the water. Formerly it was considered wrong to cut down one of these great trees, and, when large logs were needed, only such as were found fallen were used; and to-day some of the more credulous old men declare that many of the misfortunes of the people are the result of their modern...
Page 124 - Accidents that happened many Years ago; nay, two or three Ages or more. The Reason I have to believe what they tell me on this Account, is, because I have been at the Meetings of several Indian Nations, and they agreed, in relating the same Circumstances as to Time, very exactly; as for Example, they say there was so hard a Winter in Carolina...
Page 303 - I was lately owner of seventeen horses," said a Mandan to us one day, " but I have offered them all up to my medicine and am now poor." He had in reality taken all his wealth, his horses, into the plain, and turning them loose committed them to the care of his medicine and abandoned them forever.
Page 124 - Years ago; nay, two or three Ages or more. The Reason I have to believe what they tell me on this Account, is, because I have been at the Meetings of several Indian Nations, and they agreed, in relating the same Circumstances as to Time, very exactly; as for Example, they say there was so hard a Winter in Carolina 105 Years ago, that the great Sound was frozen over, and the Wild Geese came into the Woods to eat Acorns, and that they were so tame, (I suppose through Want) that they killed abundance...
Page 76 - ... families are generally such as have settled later and have been received into the community without being given the same privileges as are enjoyed by the original citizens. Among the Algonquis the lowest class were those who did not belong to the tribal community by right of birth, but were either strangers themselves or descendants of aliens. Their condition, in some respects, resembled that of slaves. They could claim no property in the land, and were more or less subject to the orders of the...
Page 80 - ... and each of them, as circumstances seemed to require, might be made an object of sacrifice and adoration. Roger Williams once disputed with some Narragansetts about the existence of Yotaanit, their god of fire. To his arguments they replied : " What ! is it possible that this fire is not a divinity ? It comes out of a cold stone ; it saves us from dying of hunger ; if a single spark falls into the dry wood it consumes the whole country. Can anything which is so powerful be other than a deity?"*...
Page 267 - ... possessed by the deceased, or his relations, and is then deposited in a grave, lined with branches: some domestic utensils are placed on it, and a kind of canopy erected over it. During this ceremony, great lamentations are made, and if the departed person is very much regretted the near relations cut off their hair, pierce the fleshy part of their thighs and arms with arrows, knives, &c. and blacken their faces with charcoal.

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