Social Movements and American Political Institutions

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Rowman & Littlefield, 1998 - Political Science - 335 pages
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Social movements in the United States are important political actors because of their scale and duration, their generation of new ideas and understandings of existing problems, their ability to mobilize those who were previously passive citizens, and the impetus they provide for restructuring and broadening the agenda of American politics. This volume combines chapters by a distinguished group of social movement scholars, from both sociology and political science, who use perspectives ranging from political process theory to rational choice and collective action approaches to evaluate the functioning of institutions of American government and the public policies that they produce. A diverse group of movements and interests are featured: women, public interest, native America, the environment, the Christian Right, abortion, gay rights, and homelessness among them.
 

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Contents

Introduction Anne N Costain and Andrew S McFarland
1
Social Movements and Theories of American Politics
7
State Building
20
Interest Organizations Political Parties and the Study
39
Mobilizing Gay Activists
59
Organizing by the Homeless
73
Use of the Initiative Process by Woman Suffrage Movements
99
The Christian Right in State Republican
117
The Environmental Movement and Congress
185
Social Movements and the Mobilization of
201
Litigation as Rebellion
216
Social Movements and Abortion
233
On the International Origins of Domestic Political
251
Where Have All the Foils Gone? Competing Theories
268
Conclusion
285
Index
320

Citizen Groups Political Parties and Electoral Coalitions
136
American Social Movements and Presidential Administrations
159
Women Lobby Congress
171
About the Contributors
333
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About the author (1998)

Anne N. Costain is professor of political science at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Andrew S. McFarland is professor of political science at the University of Illinois, Chicago.