Socialist Cities: Municipal Politics and the Grass Roots of American Socialism

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SUNY Press, Jan 1, 1989 - History - 254 pages
Socialist Cities is a comparative treatment of grass-roots Socialist successes. It marks the first comprehensive look at the urban working-class base of the American Socialist movement in the early part of the century, and reveals the importance of municipal politics as an organizing strategy.

The author assesses the reactions of both workers and non-workers to the party, and provides a fresh perspective on the perennial question of why socialism 'failed' in America. He demonstrates that the subtle and ongoing dialogue between the party's own internal theoretical and tactical weaknesses and the broader class and structural obstacles against which it struggled, contributed to its failure.
 

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Contents

The Debate on American Socialism 1
1
Socialist Politics in the Urban Milieu 18981917
19
The Locals and the Organizational Crisis 19101915
45
The Pattern in Ohio 19101915
69
Restoring Consensus in Flint Michigan
95
Lima and Lorain Ohio
119
Socialism and Civic Reform in Dayton and New Castle
141
Ohio Socialism in Decline 19171924
161
Notes
185
Index
247
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About the author (1989)

Richard W. Judd is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Maine, Orono.

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