Sociolinguistic Theory: Linguistic Variation and Its Social Significance

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Wiley, 2003 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 320 pages
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Sociolinguistic Theory presents a critical synthesis of sociolinguistics, centering on the study of language variation and change.


  • Synthesizes the most important descriptive and theoretical findings concerning linguistic variation from the last forty years.

  • Provides an integrated framework for studying language variation and its social significance.
  • Expands on the first edition's discussion of communicative competence and developmental sociolinguistics.
  • Is written by one of the world's foremost scholars in the field of variation studies and includes data from his own work.

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About the author (2003)

J. K. Chambers is Professor of Linguistics at the University of Toronto. He is co-editor of The Handbook of Language Variation and Change (with Peter Trudgill and Natalie Schilling-Estes, Wiley-Blackwell, 2002), co-author (with Peter Trudgill) of Dialectology (2nd edition, 1998), and also author of other books and scores of articles. He works extensively as a forensic consultant, and maintains a parallel vocation in jazz criticism, including the prizewinning biography Milestones: The Music and Times of Miles Davis (1998).

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