Software Industry Accounting

Front Cover
John Wiley & Sons, May 4, 2001 - Business & Economics - 624 pages
The software industry is being inundated with important accounting and valuation questions. The rules and regulations governing accounting of the software industry are very different from other industries. The software industry has unique accounting concerns, such as capitalization of development costs and software revenue recognition. This book emphasizes accounting and financial reporting, and discusses taxation, law, and general industry subjects.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Chapter 1 General Industry Perspective
1-1
Chapter 2 The AICPA Task Force on Accounting for the Development and Sale of Computer Software
2-1
Chapter 3 The Securities and Exchange Commission
3-1
Chapter 4 Software Revenue Recognition
4-1
Chapter 5 Contracts for Software Combined with Hardware or Services or Both
5-1
Chapter 6 Capitalization Amortization and Net Realizable Value Testing of Software Costs
6-1
Chapter 7 Auditing Financial Statements of Software Companies
7-1
Chapter 8 Accounting for Research and Development Arrangements
8-1
Chapter 9 Taxation of Computer Software Companies
9-1
Chapter 10 Legal Aspects of Software
10-1
Chapter 11 Software Industry Associations
11-1
Index
I-1
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 11-2 - The Americans make associations to give entertainments, to found seminaries, to build inns, to construct churches, to diffuse books, to send missionaries to the antipodes; in this manner they found hospitals, prisons, and schools. If it is proposed to inculcate some truth or to foster some feeling by the encouragement of a great example, they form a society.
Page 6-3 - Development is the translation of research findings or other knowledge into a plan or design for a new product or process or for a significant improvement to an existing product or process whether intended for sale or use.
Page 10-59 - Any controversy or claim arising out of or relating to this contract, or the breach thereof, shall be settled by arbitration in accordance with the Commercial Arbitration Rules of the American Arbitration Association, and judgment upon the award rendered by the arbitrator(s) may be entered in any court having jurisdiction thereof.
Page 11-2 - Americans of all ages, all conditions, and all dispositions constantly form associations.
Page 11-2 - They have not only commercial and manufacturing companies, in which all take part, but associations of a thousand other kinds, religious, moral, serious, futile, general or restricted, enormous or diminutive. The Americans make associations to give entertainments, to found seminaries, to build inns, to construct churches, to diffuse books, to send missionaries to the antipodes; in this manner they found hospitals, prisons, and schools.
Page 11-1 - A trade association may be defined as a nonprofit, cooperative, voluntarily-joined organization of business competitors, designed to assist its members and its industry in dealing with mutual business problems in several of the following areas: accounting practices, business ethics, commercial and industrial research, standardization, statistics, trade promotion, and relations with Government, employees, and the general public.
Page 8-3 - Research is planned search or critical investigation aimed at discovery of new knowledge with the hope that such knowledge will be useful in developing a new product or service ... or a new process or technique ... or in bringing about a significant improvement to an existing product or process.
Page 3-43 - ... make and keep books, records, and accounts, which, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the issuer...
Page 3-37 - Solely for the purpose of these proceedings and any other proceedings brought by or on behalf of the Commission, or to which the Commission is a party, and without admitting or denying the findings...

About the author (2001)

Joseph Morris is the author of Software Industry Accounting, 2nd Edition, published by Wiley.

Bibliographic information