Soils in Archaeological Research

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Oxford University Press, Aug 19, 2004 - Social Science - 464 pages
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Soils, invaluable indicators of the nature and history of the physical and human landscape, have strongly influenced the cultural record left to archaeologists. Not only are they primary reservoirs for artifacts, they often encase entire sites. And soil-forming processes in themselves are an important component of site formation, influencing which artifacts, features, and environmental indicators (floral, faunal, and geological) will be destroyed and to what extent and which will be preserved and how well. In this book, Holliday will address each of these issues in terms of fundamentals as well as in field case histories from all over the world. The focus will be on principles of soil geomorphology , soil stratigraphy, and soil chemistry and their applications in archaeological research.
 

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Contents

1 Introduction
1
2 Terminology and Methodology
13
3 Conceptual Approaches to Pedogenesis
41
4 Soil Surveys and Archaeology
53
5 Soil Stratigraphy
72
6 Soil Stratigraphy in Geoarchaeological Contexts
97
7 Soils and Time
139
8 Soils and Paleoenvironmental Reconstructions
188
10 Soil Genesis and SiteFormation Processes
261
11 Human Impacts on Soils
290
Variations on US Department of Agriculture Field Nomenclature
338
Soil Phosphorus Chemistry Analytical Methods and Chronosequences
343
Variability of Soil Laboratory Procedures and Results
363
References
375
Index
435
Copyright

9 Soils and Landscape Evolution
232

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