Some Chapters on Judaism and the Science of Religion

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Putnam, 1889 - Jews - 190 pages
 

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Page 62 - ... in determining generally in what human perfection consists, religion comes to a conclusion identical with that which culture, — culture seeking the determination of this question through all the voices of human experience which have been heard upon it, of art, science, poetry, philosophy, history, as well as of religion, in order to give a greater fulness and certainty to its solution, — likewise reaches.
Page 31 - Thousands of years have passed since the Aryan nations separated to travel to the North and the South, the West and the East ; they have each formed their languages, they have each founded empires and philosophies, they have each built temples and razed them to the ground ; they have all grown older, and it may be...
Page 11 - They thoroughly examined all the strength and frailties of our nature, and, observing that none were either so savage as not to be charmed with praise, or so despicable as patiently to bear contempt, justly concluded that flattery must be the most powerful argument that could be used to human creatures.
Page 62 - ... the deepest human experience, does not only enjoin and sanction the aim which is the great aim of culture, the aim of setting ourselves to ascertain what perfection is and to...
Page 31 - ... and razed them to the ground ; they have all grown older, and it may be wiser and better; but when they search for a name for what is most exalted and yet most dear to every one of us, when they wish to express both awe and love, the infinite and the finite, they can but do what their old fathers did when gazing up to the eternal sky, and feeling the presence of a Being as far as far and as near as near can be : they can but combine the selfsame words, and utter once more the primeval Aryan prayer,...
Page 86 - The third view is that which is taught in Scripture, and which forms one of the principles of our religion. It coincides with the opinion of the philosophers in all points except one. For we believe that, even if one has the capacity for prophecy, and has duly prepared himself, it may yet happen that he does not actually prophesy. It is in that case the will of God [that withholds from him the use of the faculty].
Page 60 - Governor of the universe,' is to talk what appears to him unverifiable nonsense. But to talk of God as 'the stream of tendency by which all things fulfil the law of their being...
Page 42 - ... of fundamental rules which are supposed to be selfevident, without which no grammar would be possible, but which, strange to say, never exist in their purity and completeness in any language that is or ever has been spoken by human beings. It is the same with religion. There never has been any real religion, consisting exclusively of the pure and simple tenets of Natural Religion...
Page 66 - ... talent for abstruse reasoning to lead him astray, — the spirit and tongue of Israel kept a propriety, a reserve, a sense of the inadequacy of language in conveying man's ideas of God, which contrast strongly with the licence of affirmation in our Western theology. "The high and holy One that inhabiteth eternity, whose name is holy,"1 is far more proper and felicitous language than "the moral and intelligent Governor of the universe...
Page 88 - God, ie, they learnt the truth of the principles contained in these two commandments in the same manner as Moses, and not through Moses. For these two principles, the existence of God and His Unity, can be arrived at by means of reasoning, and whatever can be established by proof is known by the prophet in the same way as by any other person ; he has no advantage in this respect. These two principles were not known through prophecy alone.

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