Some Personal Recollections of Dr. Janeway

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G.P. Putnam's sons, 1917 - Physicians - 36 pages
 

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Page iii - BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE C DWARD Gamaliel Janeway was born in New Brunswick, New Jersey, August 31, 1841. He was graduated from Rutgers College in 1860, receiving the degree of BA and MA from that institution. In 1864 he was graduated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York, receiving the degree of MD Later in life, the degree of LL.D. was conferred upon him, by Rutgers in 1898, by Columbia in 1904, and by Princeton in 1907.
Page iv - From 1875 tiU l882. he was Health Commissioner of New York. In 1876 he was president of the New York Medical Journal Association. His principal contributions to medical literature appear in the medical journals of New York. He was president of the Academy of Medicine in 1897 and 1898 and a trustee from 1899 until 1903. He died in Summit, New Jersey, on February 10, 1911. IN MEMORIAM On April 6, 1911, the Fellows of the New York Academy of Medicine met to honour his memory and to give reverent tribute...
Page 36 - To bring into any walk of life so much talent and truth, so much candour and courage, and withal, such simplicity and sincerity, is to leave it raised to a higher level for all time. Such lives need no tribute to their memory. On the contrary, they levy an unforgettable tax on all who would live on by lower standards. 35 To those whose minds can grasp the general disorder in which we try to live — the moral indirection of our everyday endeavour to get somewhere, this day toward a gilded goal, tomorrow...
Page 33 - IX •"THERE were three things I should say the Doctor did not like. One of these was the newspaper reporter who tried to get "inside" information when some especially prominent person happened to be a patient of his. This was not just a simple, single-sided dislike which the Doctor felt, either. The idea of any physician inviting press publicity was bad enough, but the idea of any physician telling the public about the private affairs of a patient...
Page iv - New Brunswick, NJ( Aug. 31, 1841. He was graduated from Rutgers College in 1860, and from the college of Physicians and Surgeons in 1864. He began to practice medicine in New York where he continued and ended his professional career. In 1869 he became professor of pathology and practical anatomy in Bellevue Hospital Medical College. In 1871 he was visiting physician to Bellevue Hospital where he remained for many years and where he won great distinction in the pathological department...
Page 21 - ... heard him make very much the same remark again: "Dr. R. is an excellent doctor. He won't do you any harm." I did not understand his meaning then, but the thing got stuck in my mind, and I remembered it. It was some years, I think, before that saying, for it would keep coming back to me, commenced to make its real impression. Then, as time and experience went on, clearer and clearer became its significance until I have come to see it as an expression of that wisdom—that deeper wisdom of the...
Page 24 - ... medicine. I shall never forget one day at lunch after Dr. Janeway had been seeing some of these mentally mortgaged men and women. As he sat down at table his face wore that expression of perplexity which one at times sees as the outward sign of that inward sense of the futility of things in general. I inquired how matters had 24 been going in the office that morning. His reply, "Neurasthenics!
Page iii - York City where he continued and ended his professional career. In 1869, he became professor of pathology and practical anatomy in Bellevue Hospital Medical College, continuing in that capacity until 1876. From 1868 to 1871 he was visiting physician to Charity Hospital.
Page iii - While in the medical school in the years 1862 and 1863, he was made acting medical cadet in the United States Army hospitals at Newark, New Jersey. He began to practise medicine in New iii York City where he continued and ended his professional career.
Page 24 - I inquired how matters had 24 been going in the office that morning. His reply, "Neurasthenics!" as it came out with all his characteristic bluntness, set me to asking questions. What I learned that day from the Doctor, coupled with later observations of his methods in dealing with these unfortunates, has never needed unlearning.

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