Someday Angeline

Front Cover
A&C Black, 2007 - Children's stories - 192 pages
2 Reviews
Someday, they tell her, things will be better. But for Angeline, someday can't come soon enough. Mean kids at school call her a 'genius freak', her teacher seems to dislike her and her Dad is worried about her.But when she makes friends with a boy who tells the best jokes, and a teacher who loves tropical fish, things start to get better in some surprising ways - for all of them. With Sachar's trademark plot twists and turns and lovely humour, this novel is a delight.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Cheryl_in_CC_NV - LibraryThing

A little fantastical, but then if you're a fan of Sachar (and if you're not, you should be) you're ok with that. Lots of humor (and I don't mean just the kids' jokes) but lots of insight and poignancy, too. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - stephxsu - LibraryThing

Oh my, but SOMEDAY ANGELINE is so adorable. My EL510 student who is hardest to please with the book selections for that class actually finished the whole book before our second class and declared that ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
5
Section 3
9
Section 4
14
Section 5
21
Section 6
28
Section 7
38
Section 8
45
Section 13
77
Section 14
90
Section 15
101
Section 16
114
Section 17
117
Section 18
128
Section 19
138
Section 20
148

Section 9
51
Section 10
61
Section 11
67
Section 12
71
Section 21
155
Section 22
161
Section 23
171
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Louis Sachar was born in East Meadow, New York on March 20, 1954. He attended the University of California, at Berkeley. During his senior year, he helped out at Hillside Elementary School. It was his experience there that led to his first book, Sideways Stories from Wayside School, written in 1976. After college, he worked for a while in a sweater warehouse in Norwalk, Connecticut before attending Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco, where he graduated in 1980. Sideways Stories from Wayside School was accepted for publication during his first week of law school. He worked part-time as a lawyer for eight years before becoming a full-time writer in 1989. His other works include There's a Boy in the Girls' Bathroom, the Marvin Redpost books, Fuzzy Mud, and Holes, which won the 1999 Newbery Medal, the National Book Award, and the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award and was made into a major motion picture.

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