Sonia: Between Two Worlds

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George H. Doran Company, 1917 - Fiction - 465 pages
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"I called my men from my trenches, my quarries, my wharves, and my shears, All I had wrought I abandoned to the faith of the faithless years. Only I cut on the timber, only I carved on the stone: 'After me cometh a Builder. Tell him, I too have known!'" Rudyard Kipling, "The Palace." At the age of three-and-twenty Charles Templeton, my old tutor at Oxford, set himself to write a history of the Third French Republic. When I made his acquaintance some thirty years later he had satisfactorily concluded his introductory chapter on the origin of Kingship. At his death, three months ago, I understand that his notes on the precursors of Charlemagne were almost as complete as he desired. "It is so difficult to know where to start, Mr. Oakleigh," he used to say, as I picked my steps through the litter of notebooks that cumbered his tables, chairs and floor.
 

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Page 470 - Would to God we had died by the hand of the Lord in the land of Egypt, when we sat by the flesh-pots, and when we did eat bread to the full : for ye have brought us forth into this wilderness, to kill this whole assembly with hunger.
Page 123 - The common problem, yours, mine, every one's, Is — not to fancy what were fair in life Provided it could be, — but, finding first What may be, then find how to make it fair Up to our means...
Page 290 - If, drunk with sight of power, we loose Wild tongues that have not Thee in awe; Such boasting as the Gentiles use, Or lesser breeds without the Law; Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet, Lest we forget — lest we forget!
Page 418 - Out of the night that covers me, Black as the pit from pole to pole, I thank whatever gods may be For my unconquerable soul. In the fell clutch of circumstance I have not winced nor cried aloud; Under the bludgeonings of chance My head is bloody, but unbowed.
Page 393 - Then he stood up, and trod to dust Fear and desire, mistrust and trust, And dreams of bitter sleep and sweet, And bound for sandals on his feet Knowledge and patience of what must And what things may be, in the heat And cold of years that rot and rust And alter ; and his spirit's meat Was freedom, and his staff was wrought Of strength, and his cloak woven of thought.
Page 357 - To humbler functions, awful Power ! I call thee: I myself commend Unto thy guidance from this hour ; Oh let my weakness have an end ! Give unto me, made lowly wise, The spirit of self-sacrifice; The confidence of reason give ; And in the light of truth thy Bondman let me live!
Page 64 - Much have I seen and known ; cities of men And manners, climates, councils, governments, Myself not least, but honour'd of them all; And drunk delight of battle with my peers, Far on the ringing plains of windy Troy. I am a part of all that I have met; Yet all experience is an arch wherethro' Gleams that untravell'd world, whose margin fades For ever and for ever when I move.
Page 33 - Death will come when thou art dead, Soon, too soon — Sleep will come when thou art fled; Of neither would I ask the boon I ask of thee, beloved Night— Swift be thine approaching flight, Come soon, soon!
Page ii - All I had wrought I abandoned to the faith of the faithless years. Only I cut on the timber, only I carved on the stone : After me cometh a Builder. Tell him, I too have known...
Page 440 - And lose, and start again at your beginnings And never breathe a word about your loss; If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew To serve your turn long after they are gone, And so hold on when there is nothing in you Except the Will which says to them: "Hold on...

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