Sound recording practice: a handbook

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 1980 - Antiques & Collectibles - 503 pages
0 Reviews
In this invaluable book, a broad range of contributors--musicians, acousticians, electronic engineers, and broadcasters--share their specialized expertise on the equipment used to record, transmit, and reproduce speech and music and the operational techniques that have evolved over half acentury in the sound recording industry. This fourth edition, newly revised and comprehensive, emphasizes the array of new technologies and techniques such as rapid advances in recording techniques, computer-controlled equipment, new digital recording formats, and the proliferation of consumeraudio/video media. Addressing the user rather than the designer or manufacturer, Sound Recording Practice offers a stimulating, informative, and comprehensive guide to each aspect of recording.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The making of a gramophone record
3
Quality criteria
11
Crosstalk
17
Copyright

36 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1980)

Borwick graduated from Edinburgh University with a BSc (Physics) degree and, after 4 years as Signal Officer in the RAF and 11 years at the BBC as studio manager and instructor, helped to set up and run for 10 years the Tonmeister degree course at the University of Surrey. He was Secretary of the Association of Professional Recording Services for many years and is now an Honorary Member. He is also a Fellow of the AES where he served terms as Chairman and Vice President.

Bibliographic information