Sources of Tibetan Tradition

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Kurtis R. Schaeffer, Matthew Kapstein, Gray Tuttle
Columbia University Press, 2013 - History - 810 pages
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The most comprehensive collection of Tibetan works in a Western language, this volume illuminates the complex historical, intellectual, and social development of Tibetan civilization from its earliest beginnings to the modern period. Including more than 180 representative writings, Sources of Tibetan Tradition spans Tibet's vast geography and long history, presenting for the first time a diversity of works by religious and political leaders; scholastic philosophers and contemplative hermits; monks and nuns; poets and artists; and aristocrats and commoners. The selected readings reflect the profound role of Buddhist sources in shaping Tibetan culture while illustrating other major areas of knowledge. Thematically varied, they address history and historiography; political and social theory; law; medicine; divination; rhetoric; aesthetic theory; narrative; travel and geography; folksong; and philosophical and religious learning, all in relation to the unique trajectories of Tibetan civil and scholarly discourse. The editors begin each chapter with a survey of broader social and cultural contexts and introduce each translated text with a concise explanation. Concluding with writings that extend into the early twentieth century, this volume offers an expansive encounter with Tibet's exceptional intellectual heritage.

 

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Contents

Tibet in Medieval Chinese Islamic and Western Sources
3
The Tibetan Invasion of the Chinese Capital
16
Imperial Records from Dunhuang
35
Tibet Conquers the Chinese Capital
51
Imperial Edicts from Central and Far Eastern Tibet
57
Inscriptions and Edicts from the Reign of Tri Desongtsen
66
The ChineseTibetan Treaty of 821822
76
Institutions and Knowledge Under the Tibetan Empire
87
The Beginnings ofthe Gandenpa School
507
The Founding of the Great Prayer Festival of Lhasa
518
The Meeting Between Altan Khan and Sönam Gyatso
525
The Fifth Dalai Lama and the Ganden Government
531
Aristocrats Monks and Hermits
556
Public and Political Affairs
563
Religious and Political Developments in Eastern Tibet
585
Figures from the Kingdom of Dergé
607

The Tibetan Ramayana from Dunhuang
100
Early Religion and the Beginnings ofBuddhism
126
PART
165
The Lineages of the Shangpa Kagyü and Pacification
230
The Bön Tradition
250
The Development ofthe Medical Tradition
278
PART THREE
299
Historians and Historical Documents ofthe
326
Butöns Jewelry of Scripture
401
Literary Developments
425
Words of Joy in a Forest Grove
433
Writings on Death and Dying
446
The Growth ofthe Arts and Sciences
468
Encountering Other Cultures
622
Jikmé Lingpas Indian Discourses
630
Religious Writers in Amdo and Kham
659
Some Surprises Due to a Conversation
689
Early TwentiethCentury Tibetan Encounters
703
Tibetans Addressing Modern Political Issues
727
A Tibetan Newspaper from West Bengal
739
The SinoTibetan Buddhist Academy
748
Credits
757
For Further Reading
765
Index
773
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About the author (2013)

Kurtis R. Schaeffer is professor and chair of the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Virginia. He is the author of The Culture of the Book in Tibet and Himalayan Hermitess: The Life of a Tibetan Buddhist Nun. With Gray Tuttle, he is coeditor of The Tibetan History Reader.

Matthew T. Kapstein is director of Tibetan Studies at the École Pratique des Hautes Études in Paris and Numata Visiting Professor of Buddhist Studies at the University of Chicago. He is the author of The Tibetans and The Tibetan Assimilation of Buddhism: Conversion, Contestation, and Memory.

Gray Tuttle is the Leila Hadley Luce Associate Professor of Modern Tibet in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at Columbia University. He is the author of Tibetan Buddhists in the Making of Modern China and the editor of Mapping the Modern in Tibet. With Kurtis R. Schaeffer, he is coeditor of The Tibetan History Reader.

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