Sources of the West: From the 1600 to the present

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Longman, 1997 - History - 340 pages
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Sources of the West is a collection of excerpts from primary source documents designed to supplement textbooks and lectures in the teaching of Western Civilization. These documents are the source material historians use to construct their accounts and interpretations of history. As they examine these source materials, students learn to think historically - to examine the ideas of others, to understand past experiences on others' terms, to recognize other points of view.

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Contents

The Wars of Religion
3
Francois Hotman Francogallia 1573
4
Henry PV The Edict of Nantes 1598
8
William of Orange The Apology 1580
10
Cardinal Richelieu The Political Testament 1638
14
Hans von Grimmelshausen Simplicissimus 1669
17
Subjects and Sovereigns
23
James I True Law of a Free Monarchy 1598
24
Pierre Proudhon What Is Property? 1840
170
The Great Charter 1842
174
William II Letter to the Shogun 1844 Bakufu Reply to the Government of Holland 1845
178
Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels The Communist Manifesto 1848
182
Alexander II and Prince Kropotkin The Emancipation of the Serfs 1861
186
Otto von Bismarck Reflections and Reminiscences 1898 and Speech to the Reichstag 1879
189
Emancipating the Mind and the Body
195
Charles Darwin The Descent of Man 1871
196

Philippe DuplessisMornay A Defense of Liberty Against Tyrants 1579
29
Thomas Hobbes Leviathan 1651
34
Sir William Clarke The Putney Debates 1647
38
Due de SaintSimon Memoirs 16941723
44
Science and Commerce
49
Galileo Galilei Letter to the Grand Duchess Christina 1615
50
Rene Descartes Discourse on Method 1637
54
Thomas Mun Englands Treasure by Foreign Trade 1664
58
John Locke The Second Treatise Concerning Government
63
Adam Smith The Wealth of Nations 1776
67
Enlightened Monarchy
73
Catherine the Great Memoirs ca 1755
74
Maria Theresa Testament 174950
77
Viscount Bolingbroke The Idea of a Patriot King 1749
81
The Enlightenment
85
Voltaire Candide 1759
86
JeanJacques Rousseau The Social Contract 1762
90
Montesquieu Spirit of the Laws 1748
94
Thomas Jefferson The Declaration of Independence 1776
98
Cesare Beccaria On Crimes and Punishments 1764
101
Marquis de Condorcet The Progress of the Human Mind 1793
105
The French Revolution
109
Abbe de Sieyes What Is the Third Estate? 1789
110
The Declaration of the Rights of Man 1789 Olympe de Gouges The Declaration of the Rights of Woman 1791
115
Edmund Burke Reflections on the Revolution in France 1790
120
Jakob Walter Memoirs ca 1849
123
Industrialization in Britain
131
Arthur Young Political Arithmetic 1774
132
Samuel Smiles SelfHelp 1859
136
Sir Edwin Chadwick Inquiry into the Condition of the Poor 1842
140
Friedrich Engels The Condition of the Working Class in England 1845
145
NineteenthCentury Society and Culture
151
Jane Austen Pride and Prejudice 1813
152
HenriettaLucy Madame de la Tour du Pin Memoirs 182043
156
Alexis Soyer Modern Housewife 1850 Mrs Beetons Book of Household Management 1861
160
Political Critiques
165
J S Mill On Liberty 1859
166
Sigmund Freud The Interpretation of Dreams 1899
199
E Sylvia Pankhurst History of the Suffrage Movement 1912
203
Beatrice Webb Women and the Factory Acts 1896
208
Thoughts on Empire
215
J A Hobson Imperialism 1902
216
Cecil Rhodes Confession of Faith 1877
219
Rudyard Kipling The White Mans Burden 1899
222
George Orwell Shooting an Elephant 1936
224
TwentiethCentury Europe
231
War and Revolution
233
Woodrow Wilson The Fourteen Points 1918
237
Lenin What Is to Be Done? 1902
240
Alexandra Kollontai Theses on Communist Morality in the Sphere of Marital Relations 1921
244
The Second World War
251
Adolf Hitler Mein Kampf 1923
260
Memories of the Holocaust 193845
264
Winston Churchill Speeches 1940
270
Adolf Eichmann Testimony 1961
273
The TwentiethCentury Imagination
277
Virginia Woolf A Room of Ones Own 1929
278
Alexander Solzhenitsyn One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich 1962
283
JeanPaul Sartre Existentialism 1946
288
Simone de Beauvoir The Second Sex 1949
291
The Transformation of Eastern Europe
297
Winston Churchill The Iron Curtain 1946
298
Nikita Khrushchev Report to the Communist Party Congress 1961
302
Vaclav Havel Living in Truth 1986
306
Lech Walesa A Way of Hope 1987
309
Mikhail Gorbachev Perestroika 1987
313
Francis Fukuyama The End of History? 1989
318
Toward a New World
325
Charter of the United Nations 1946
326
The Charter of Economic Rights and Duties of States 1974
330
Acknowledgments
337
Photo Credits
341
Copyright

About the author (1997)

Mark Kishlansky
Mark Kishlansky is Frank B. Baird, Jr. Professor of English and European History and Associate Dean of the Faculty at Harvard University. Before joining the Harvard Faculty he taught for sixteen years at the University of Chicago where he was a member of the Committee on Social Thought. Professor Kishlansky is a specialist on seventeenth-century English political history and has written, among other works, "A Monarchy Transformed, The Rise of the New Model Army and "Parliamentary Selection: Social and Political Choice in Early Modern England. From 1984-1991 he was editor of the "Journal of British Studies. He is currently writing a history of the reign of Charles I entitled "The Death of Kings.

Patrick Geary
Holding a Ph.D. in Medieval Studies from Yale University, Patrick Geary has broad experience in interdisciplinary approaches to European history and civilization. He has served as the Director of the Medieval Institute at the University of Notre Dame as well as Director for the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at UCLA where he is currently Professor of History. He has also held positions at the University of Florida and Princeton University and has taught at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris and the University of Vienna. His many publications include" Readings in Medieval History; Before France and Germany: The Creation and Transformation of the Merovingian World; Furta Sacra: Thefts of Relics in the Central Middle Ages; and "Phantoms of Remembrance: Memory and Oblivion at the End of the First Millennium.

Patricia O'Brien
Between 1995 and 1999, Patricia O'Brien worked to foster collaborativeinterdisciplinary research in the humanities as director of the University of California Humanities Research Institute. Since 1999, she has held the position of dean of the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences at the University of California, Riverside. She has held appointments at the University of California, Irvine, Yale University, and at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris. Professor OBrien is a specialist in modern French cultural and social history and has published widely on the history of crime, punishment, cultural theory, urban history, and gender issues. Representative publications include "The Promise of Punishment: Prisons in Nineteenth-Century France; "The Kleptomania Diagnosis: Bourgeois Women and Theft in Late Nineteenth-Century France" in "Expanding the Past: A Reader in Social History; and "Michel Foucault's History of Culture" in "The New Cultural History, edited by Lynn Hunt.