South African Literature After the Truth Commission: Mapping Loss

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Macmillan, Apr 15, 2009 - Fiction - 235 pages
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In the wake of apartheid, South African culture conveys the sense of being lost in time and space. The Truth Commission provided an opportunity for South Africans to find their bearings in a nation changing at a bewildering pace; the TRC also marked the beginning of a long process of remapping space, place, and memory. In this groundbreaking book, Shane Graham investigates how post-apartheid theatre-makers and writers of fiction, poetry, and memoir have taken this project forward, using their art to come to terms with South Africa’s violent past and rapidly changing present.

 

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Contents

Spaces of TruthTelling The TRC and PostApartheid Literatures of Memory
23
The Story I Am about to Tell and He Left Quietly
34
Ubu and the Truth Commission
40
Antjie Krogs Country of My Skull
49
Ingrid de Koks Transfer and Terrestrial Things
62
Sindiwe Magonas Mother to Mother
76
Conclusion
84
PostApartheid Urban Spaces
87
Aziz Hassims The Lotus People
127
Conclusion
134
Excavations and the Memory of Landscapes
135
Anne Landsmans The Devils Chimney
142
Zoe Wicombs Davids Story
151
Zakes Mdas The Heart of Redness
167
Conclusion
176
Conclusion
179

Achmat Dangors Bitter Fruit
94
Ivan Vladislavics The Exploded View
103
Phaswane Mpes Welcome to Our Hillbrow
114
K Sello Duikers The Quiet Violence of Dreams
120
Notes
185
Bibliography
209
Index
225
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About the author (2009)

Shane Graham is an Assistant Professor of English at Utah State University, and was formerly a Mellon Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa.

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