South-western Methodism: A History of the M.E. Church in the South-west from 1844 to 1864 : Comprising the Martyrdom of Bewley and Others, Persecutions of the M.E. Church, and Its Reorganization, Etc

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Poe & Hitchcock, 1868 - Slavery and the church - 469 pages
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Page 11 - has waged cruel war against human nature itself, violating its most sacred rights of life and liberty in the persons of a distant people who never offended him, captivating them and carrying them into slavery, in another hemisphere, or to incur miserable death in their transportation hither.
Page 73 - that all men have a natural and indefeasible right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own consciences; that no human authority can control or interfere with the rights of conscience ; that no person can ever be hurt, molested, or restrained in his religious professions or sentiments, if he do not disturb others in their religious worship.
Page 98 - slavery is contrary to the laws of God, man, and nature, and hurtful to society; contrary to the dictates of conscience and pure religion ; doing that which we would not that others should do to us and ours; and that we pass our disapprobation upon all our friends who keep slaves and advise
Page 310 - thrown down thine altars, and slain thy prophets with the sword, and I, even I only am left, -and they seek my life to take it away.
Page 452 - liberty to the captives, and the opening the prison to them that are bound; to proclaim the acceptable year of our Lord, and the day of vengeance of
Page 18 - He that stealeth a man and selleth him, or if he be found in his hand, he shall surely be put to death.
Page 362 - He that stealeth a man and selleth him, or if he be found in his hand, he shall surely be put to death.
Page 15 - of God, man, and nature, and hurtful to society; contrary to the dictates of conscience and pure religion, and doing that which we would not that others should do to us and ours. We pass our disapprobation on all our friends who keep slaves, and advise their freedom.
Page 202 - It is the duty of the slave to aim at freedom. ' Art thou called being a servant, care not for it, but if thou mayest be free, use it rather.
Page 452 - And ye shall hallow the fiftieth year, and proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof; it shall be a jubilee unto

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