Southwark cathedral formerly the collegiate church of St. Saviour, otherwise St. Mary Overie: A short history and description of the fabric, with some account of the college and the see, Volume 36

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G. Bell, 1905 - Architecture - 114 pages
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Page 26 - Book was its total suppression in 1645 for a period of fifteen years. " the Directory for the Public Worship of God in the Three Kingdoms " being established in its place.
Page 21 - ... in this place they had their ovens, in that a bolting! place, in that their kneading trough, in another (I have heard) a hog's trough, for the words that were given me were these : ' this place have I knowne a hog-stie, in another a store-house to store up their hoarded meal,' and in all of it something of this sordid kind and condition.
Page 14 - 3 that is, over the water. This church, or some other in place thereof, was, of old time, long before the Conquest, a house of sisters, founded by a maiden named Mary ; unto the which house and sisters she left, as was left to her by her parents, the oversight and profits of a cross ferry, or traverse ferry over the Thames, there kept before that any bridge was built.
Page 14 - ... ferry over the Thames, there kept before that any bridge was built. This house of sisters was after by Swithen, a noble lady, converted into a college of priests, who in place of the ferry built a bridge of timber, and from time to time kept the same in good reparations ; but lastly the same bridge was built of stone ; and then in the year 1106 was this church again founded for canons regulars by William Pont de la Arche and William Dauncy, knights, Normans. William...
Page 33 - ... as ever disgraced the nineteenth century. It is bad enough to see such an erection spring up at all, but when a venerable building is demolished to make way for it, the case is quite intolerable. Will it be believed, that under the centre tower in the transept of this once most beauteous church, staircases on stilts have been set up, exactly resembling those by which the company ascend to a booth on a race-course ? We entreat every admirer of ancient...
Page 79 - From all sedition and privy conspiracy, from the tyranny of the Bishop of Rome, and all his detestable enormities, from all false doctrine and heresy, from hardness of heart, and contempt of thy word and commandment.
Page 32 - While thus noticing gallery staircases in churches, it may not be amiss to draw public attention to the atrocities that have lately been perpetrated in the venerable church of St. Saviour's, Southwark. But a few years since it was one of the most perfect second-class cruciform churches in England, and an edifice full of the most interesting associations connected with the ancient history of this metropolis.
Page 26 - Women of a far better rank and quality than she, and for such whose husbands pay far greater duties than hers, and hath always been reserved for some of the chiefest Women dwelling on the Borough side of the said Parish, and never any of the Bankside were placed there.
Page 32 - ... in the venerable church of St. Saviour's, Southwark. But a few years since it was one of the most perfect secondclass cruciform churches in England, and an edifice full of the most interesting associations connected with the metropolis. The roof of its massive and solemn nave was first stripped off; in this state it was left a considerable time exposed to all the injuries of wet weather ; at length it was condemned to be pulled down, and in place of one of the finest specimens of ecclesiastical...
Page 33 - ... over its wretched condition, and then join in loud and lasting execrations against all concerned in this sacrilegious and barbarous destruction — ecclesiastical, parochial, or civil authorities, architect, builder, and every one in the least implicated in this business. Nothing but Protestantism and the preaching-house system could have brought such utter desolation on a stately church ; in fact the abomination is so great that it must be seen to be credited.

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