Space Physiology

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, Feb 9, 2006 - Medical - 304 pages
The success of any space flight mission depends not only on advanced technology but also on the health and well-being of crew members. This book, written by an astronaut physician, is the first practical guide to maintaining crew members health in space. It combines research results with practical advice on such problems as bone loss, kidney stones, muscle wasting, motion sickness, loss of balance, orthostatic intolerance, weight loss, and excessive radiation exposure. Additional topics include pre-flight preparation, relevant gender differences, long-duration medical planning, post-flight rehabilitation, and the physiology of extra-vehicular activity. Designed as a handbook for space crews, this text is also an invaluable tool for all the engineers, medical personnel, and scientists who plan and execute space missions.
 

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Contents

Establishing a Safe Level
53
A Practical Approach to Maintaining Strength
77
Performing EVA Safely
101
Neurovestibular Effects of Spaceflight and Their Operational Consequences
119
Atrophy Arrhythmias and Orthostatic Intolerance
139
Maintaining Body Mass and Preventing Disease
169
Prevention and Treatment
187
Identifying and Managing the Relevant Differences
207
Preparation and Rehabilitation
223
Medical Care on the Way to the Moon and Mars
239
Index
267
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About the author (2006)

Jay C. Buckey, Jr., M.D. is Associate Professor of Medicine, Dartmouth Medical School, and Team Lead, Technology Development Team, National Space Biomedical Research Institute. He was a payload specialist astronaut on the STS-90, Neurolab Space Shuttle mission.

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