Speaking of Indians

Front Cover
U of Nebraska Press, 1944 - Social Science - 163 pages
0 Reviews
Ella Deloria could speak intimately about Indian ways because she belonged to a Yankton Sioux family. A distinguished scholar who studied with Franz Boas at Columbia University, she had the gift of language and the understanding necessary to bridge races. Originally published in 1944, this book is an important source of information about Dakota culture and a classic in its elegant clarity of insight. Beginning with a general discussion of American Indian origins, language families, and culture areas, Deloria then focuses on her own people, the Dakotas, and the intricate kinship system that governed all aspects of their life. Deloria goes on to show the painful transition to reservations and how the holdover of the kinship system worked against Indians trying to follow white notions of progress and success. Her ideas about what both races must do to participate fully in American life are as cogent now as when they were first written.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

THE INDIAN ENTERS AMERICA
1
TRIBAL LANGUAGES AND CULTURE AREAS
10
SPIRITUAL CULTURE AREAS
18
Part II
24
LIFE IN TIPI AND CAMPCIRCLE
38
PRAYING FOR POWER
49
EDUCATIONBY PRECEPT AND EXAMPLE
63
ECONOMICS GIVING TO HAVE
68
LIFE IN LOG CABIN AND ON ALLOTMENTS
86
CHRISTIANS OF THE FIRST GENERATION
98
ECONOMICS GETTING TO HAVE
119
Part IV
136
TOWARD THE NEW COMMUNITY
150
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1944)

Ella Deloria, born in 1889 on the Yankton Reservation, spent her childhood on the Standing Rock Reservation. Her writings include Dakota Texts, Dakota Grammar (a collaboration with Boas), and Waterlily (also a Bison Book). Introducer Vine Deloria Jr. is the author of Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto and other books.

Bibliographic information