Speculum Amantis: Love-poems from Rare Song-books and Miscellanies of the Seventeenth Century

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Arthur Henry Bullen
Chiswick Press, printed by Charles Whittingham and Company, 1889 - English poetry - 129 pages
 

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Page 77 - EVEN such is time, which takes in trust Our youth, our joys, and all we have, And pays us nought but age and dust, Which in the dark and silent grave, When we have wandered all our ways, Shuts up the story of our days ; And from which grave, and earth, and dust, The Lord shall raise me up I trust.
Page 27 - UNDERNEATH this myrtle shade, On flowery beds supinely laid, With odorous oils my head o'erflowing, And around it roses growing, What should I do but drink away The heat and troubles of the day? In this more than kingly state Love himself shall on me wait. Fill to me, Love! nay, fill it up! And mingled cast into the cup Wit and mirth and noble fires, Vigorous health and gay desires. The wheel of life no less will stay In a smooth than rugged way: Since it equally does flee, Let the motion pleasant...
Page 52 - WEET, exclude me not, nor be divided From him that ere long must bed thee : All thy maiden doubts law hath decided ; Sure we are, and I must wed thee. Presume then yet a little more : Here's the way, bar not the door. Tenants, to fulfil their landlord's pleasure, Pay their rent before the quarter : Tis my case, if you it rightly measure ; Put me not then off with laughter. Consider then a little more : Here's the way to all my store. Why were doors in love's despite devised ? Are not laws enough...
Page 12 - My Love in her attire doth show her wit, It doth so well become her : For every season she hath dressings fit, For Winter, Spring, and Summer. No beauty she doth miss When all her robes are on : But Beauty's self she is When all her robes are gone.
Page 105 - sa tyrant in your eyes Your heart is but a slave. My love is full of noble pride, Nor can it e'er submit To let that fop, Discretion, ride In triumph over it. False friends I have, as well as you, Who daily counsel me Fame and ambition to pursue, And leave off loving thee. But when the least regard I show To fools who thus advise, May I be dull enough to grow Most miserably wise.
Page 6 - BEAUTY, since you so much desire To know the place of Cupid's fire, About you somewhere doth it rest, Yet never harbour"d in your breast, Nor gout-like in your heel or toe, — What fool would seek Love's flame so low ? But a little higher, but a little higher, There, there, O there lies Cupid's fire. Think not, when Cupid most you scorn, Men judge that you of ice were born ; For though you cast love at your heel, His fury yet...
Page 6 - MISTRESS, since you so much desire To know the place of Cupid's fire, In your fair shrine that flame doth rest, Yet never harboured in your breast. It 'bides not in your lips so sweet, Nor where the rose and lilies meet ; But a little higher, but a little higher, There, there, O there lies Cupid's fire.
Page 104 - SOME men desire spouses That come of noble houses. And some would have in marriage Ladies of courtly carriage. But few desire, as I do, The maidenhead of a widow.
Page 76 - Id have it Only of wantonness and wit. At love's entreaty such a one Nature made, but with her beauty She hath framed a heart of stone; So as love, by ill destiny, Must die for her whom nature gave him, Because her darling would not save him. But time (which nature doth despise And rudely gives her love the lie, Makes hope a fool, and sorrow wise) His hands...
Page 77 - So as Love, by ill destiny, Must die for her whom nature gave him, Because her darling would not save him. But Time, which Nature doth despise And rudely gives her love the lie, Makes hope a fool, and sorrow wise, His hands doth neither wash nor dry; But being made of steel and rust, Turns snow, and silk, and milk to dust.

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