Speech of Mr. Felch, of Michigan, on ceding the public lands to the states in which they are situated: Delivered in the Senate of the United States, January 13, 1851

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Printed at the Congressional globe office, 1851 - Law - 20 pages
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Page 16 - September last, shall be disposed of for the common benefit of the United States and be settled and formed into distinct republican States, which shall become members of the Federal Union and have the same rights of sovereignty, freedom and independence as the other States...
Page 18 - States appears to combine all the chief requisites of the greatest efficiency. It is uniform throughout the vast federation ; it is unchangeable save by Congress, and has never been materially altered ; it renders the acquisition of new land easy, and yet, by means of a price, restricts appropriation to the actual wants of the settler ; it is so simple as to be readily understood ; it provides for accurate surveys and against needless delays; it gives an instant and secure title; and it admits of...
Page 18 - ... all classes and persons upon precisely equal terms. That system has promoted an amount of immigration and settlement, of which the history of the world affords no other example; and it has produced to the United States a revenue which has averaged about half a million sterling per annum, and has amounted in one twelvemonth to above four millions sterling, or more than the whole expenditure of the Federal Government.
Page 18 - The system of the United States appears to combine all the chief requisites of the greatest efficiency. It is uniform throughout the vast federation ; it is unchangeable save by Congress, and has never been materially altered ; it renders the acquisition of new land easy, and yet, by means of a price, restricts appropriation to the actual wants of the settler ; it is so simple...
Page 13 - ... question as to the power of the General Government to limit the free action of the States by annexing such conditions to the tenure and transfer of land within their limits, and to control future legislation by present legislative stipulations. We have a stipulation in all the new States, I believe, that they shall not interfere with the primary disposal of the public lands by the United States, and this is also the spirit of the Constitution. When the lands are once disposed of by the General...
Page 6 - ... (HF) No. 3. of the State of Maryland, No. 86 of the Continent of America," of the Town of Union Bridge, Carroll county, Maryland, and Also, of 17 other citizens of Maryland, praying that a certain portion of real estate may be exempted in the new constitution, from any forced sale, extent or levy, on execution or decree from or by any court of law or equity; Which was read and referred to the committee on the Bill of Rights.
Page 5 - ... all the great interests of this country. In considering this bill, we come to the class of cases thus presented to Congress, which involve a total change in the whole system of disposing of the public domain, and substituting another. It presents, in my opinion, a subject of so great importance, that I trust I may be excused for calling the attention of the Senate to some considerations with regard to it. What, then, does this bill which we have before us propose? It proposes a series of changes,...
Page 17 - ... down the Ohio river, Prof. Putnam expressed himself as having been highly pleased with the day's work. From Charlestown we went to Lexington in Scott county. From this place we were accompanied by Doctor Jordan, Dr. Hutchinson and Mr. Powell to a locality which has excited the curiosity of the whites from the earliest settlement of the country to the present time. The location of these antiquities is in the northeast corner of Clarke county on section 32, T. 2, R. 10, about one mile below Dean's...
Page 15 - ... demand for reform was significant. Walker and Seward had presented many such memorials. The petitioners were from New York City, Newport, and Chicago (Sen. MSS, CPL, Jan. 28, March 5, Feb. 7, 25; March 26; April 23, May 14, 1850). The May memorial from citizens of Chicago declared the petitioners knew "the right to life includes the right to a place to live.
Page 5 - Senate bill 85, to cede the Public Lands of the United States to the States respectively in which they are situated, on condition that the said States shall severally grant and convey the said lands to actual occupants only, in limited quantities, for cost of survey, transfer, and title muniments merely — Mr.

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