Speech of Mr. McDuffie, on Internal Improvements: With a Few Introductory Remarks in Answer to a Pamphlet Entitled "Consolidation."

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Page 4 - Crawford advocated a renewal of the old charter, it was considered a federal measure ; which internal improvements never was, as this author erroneously states. This latter measure originated in the administration of Mr. Jefferson, with the appropriation for the Cumberland road ; and was first proposed, as a system, by Mr. Calhoun, and carried through the House of Representatives by a large majority of the republicans, including almost every one of the leading men who carried ns through the late...
Page 3 - ... Calhoun and that their trust was not misplaced in 1824 the succeeding years amply proved. If South Carolina "is not destined to become a Federal State" she cannot support Gen. Jackson, declared Dr. Cooper, for "his politics are not the politics of the State —for he supported to the utmost of his power a principle and a measure which, from the very moment of party difference, has decidedly characterized the Federal Party.
Page 6 - Cheves, men who will be regarded as the brightest ornaments of South Carolina, and the strongest pillars of the Republican party, as long as the late war shall be remembered, and talents and patriotism shall be regarded as the proper objects of the admiration and gratitude of a free people!!
Page 6 - ... majority of the South Carolina delegation in Congress, modestly extends the denunciation to Mr. Monroe, and the whole republican party. Here are his words: — ' During the administration of Mr. Monroe much has passed which the republican party would be glad to approve if they could!! But the principal feature, and that which has chiefly elicited these observations, is the renewal of the SYSTEM OF INTERNAL IMPROVEMENTS.
Page 12 - He declared that the constitutional convention "did not regard the state governments as sentinels upon the watch-towers of freedom, or in any respect more worthy of confidence than the general government." When the bill came to the final vote in the House of Representatives, New England gave 12 votes in favor and 26 against; the middle states, 37 to 26 (New York, 7 to 24) ; the south, 23 to 34; the west, 43 to o.
Page 8 - Government would have passed from the hands of the many to the hands of the few, and this organized money power from its secret conclave would have dictated the choice of your highest officers and compelled you to make peace or war, as best suited their own wishes. The forms of your Government might for a time have remained, but its living spirit would have departed from it.
Page 6 - So, then, internal improvement is not one of the federal heresies. One paragraph more, sir : " The author in question, not content with denouncing as federalists. General Jackson, Mr. Adams, Mr. Calhoun, and the majority of the South Carolina delegation in congress, modestly extends the denunciation to Mr. Monroe, and the whole republican party. Here are his words: 'During the administration of Mr. Monroe much has passed which the republican party would be glad to approve if they could! But the principal...
Page 6 - Now this measure was adopted by a vote of 115 to 86 of a republican congress, and sanctioned by a republican president. Who, then, is this author, who assumes the high prerogative of denouncing, in the name of the republican party, the republican administration of the country ? A...
Page 6 - ... author in question, not content with denouncing as Federalists, General Jackson, Mr. Adams, Mr. Calhoun, and the majority of the South Carolina delegation in Congress, modestly extends the denunciation to Mr. Monroe and the whole Republican party. Here are his words: 'During the administration of Mr. Monroe much has passed which the Republican party would be glad to approve if they could!! But the principal feature, and that which has chiefly elicited these observations, is the renewal of the...
Page 27 - ... anxious to afford the established church every protection and support which can and ought to be given to it consistent with justice to all classes of the subjects of this kingdom ; but of this I am confident, that it will not be best maintained by keeping up a system of injustice and exclusion ; and, if I may be allowed to express an opinion on the subject, 1 will...

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