Speeches of Eminent British Statesmen During the Thirty-nine Years' Peace

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R.Griffin and Company, 1857 - Great Britain - 332 pages
 

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Page 107 - ... expedient that all such Persons should be manumitted and set free, and that a reasonable Compensation should be made to the Persons hitherto entitled to the services of such Slaves for the Loss which they will incur by being deprived of their Right to such Services : And...
Page 310 - ... good conduct, and by the steady and energetic exertion of the moral and intellectual faculties with which his Creator has endowed him. To govern such a people as this is indeed an object worthy of the ambition of the noblest man who lives in the land, and, therefore, I find no fault with those who may think any opportunity a fair one for endeavouring to place themselves in so distinguished and honourable a position; but I contend that we have not in our foreign policy done anything to forfeit...
Page 158 - ... whether we mean to continue the injustice which has been already done to it, or to hold out the hope that it will be treated in the same manner as England and Scotland. That is the question. We know what " lip service" is ; we do not want that. There are some men who will even declare that they are willing to refuse justice to Ireland ; while there are others who, though they are ashamed to say so, are ready to consummate the iniquity, and they do so. England never did do justice to Ireland —...
Page 265 - ... them redress, then, no doubt, to those courts of justice the British subject ought in the first instance to apply; and it is only on a denial of justice, or upon decisions manifestly unjust, that the British Government should be called upon to interfere. But there may be cases in which no confidence can be placed in the tribunals, those tribunals being, from their composition and nature, not of a character to inspire any hope of obtaining justice from them. It has been said: "We do not apply...
Page 87 - I had acted the part of an advocate, and that some of my statements were coloured to serve a cause. How dares any man so to accuse me ? How dares any one, skulking under a fictitious name, to launch his slanderous imputations from his covert ? I come forward in my own person. I make the charge in the face of day. I drag the criminal to trial. I openly call down justice on his head. I defy his attacks. I defy his defenders. I challenge investigation.
Page 123 - ... slave. I entirely concur in the observation of Mr. Burke, repeated and more happily expressed by Mr. Canning, that the masters of slaves are not to be trusted with making laws upon slavery; that nothing they do is ever found effectual; and that if by some miracle they even chance to enact a ^wholesome regulation, it is always found to want what Mr. Burke calls " the executory principle ;
Page 20 - Pretender's army in 1745 than in Tipperary now. It is idle to threaten us with civil war; for we have it already; and it is because we are resolved to put an end to it that we are called base, and brutal, and bloody. Such are the epithets which the honorable and learned Member for Dublin thinks it becoming to pour forth against the party to which he owes every political privilege that he enjoys. He need not fear that any member of that party will be provoked into a conflict of scurrility. Use makes...
Page 265 - I say, then, that if our subjects abroad have complaints against individuals, or against the government of a foreign country, if the courts of law of that country can afford them redress, then, no doubt, to those courts of justice the British subject ought in the first instance to apply; and it is only on a denial of justice, or upon decisions manifestly unjust, that the British government should be called upon to interfere.
Page 321 - ... change at the termination of the present contest, what will be her actual position with respect to Turkey? I do not wish upon this point that you should rely upon any opinion or statement of mine ; but will refer to an authority above all exception, that of Count Nesselrode himself. Some time after the conclusion of the treaty of Adrianople, Count Nesselrode wrote to the Grand Duke Constantino...
Page 141 - ... counterbalanced by the political evils which would inevitably result from placing this bank under the control of the government. I think that the effect of the state having the complete control of the circulating medium in its own hands would be most mischievous. Under these circumstances, sir, I certainly am prepared to propose the continuation of a single bank of issue in the metropolis, subject to the control of the publicity of their accounts. If we were now, for the first time, establishing...

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