Spice Crops

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CABI, 2002 - Technology & Engineering - 411 pages
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The first authentic record of spice and herb usage is on clay tablets from the Sumarian Kingdom about 3,000 BC, and many spices were used or imported into Egypt for embalming, as incense, ointments, perfumes, poison antidotes, cosmetics and medicines. Plants that are the source of spices became important cash crops over the centuries, and since their introduction, their uses have multiplied. This has resulted in a rise in consumer demand following the popularity for natural flavorings, which has in turn increased interest in their production in temperate and tropical countries. This book is concerned with the profitable production of spice crops at all levels of management, more efficient processing and greater utilization.
 

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Contents

Lauraceae
45
Leguminosae
77
Myristicaceae
86
Myrtaceae
104
Orchidaceae
136
Piperaceae
155
Solanaceae
190
Umbelliferae
219
Fennel
284
Zingiberaceae
299
Ginger
316
Turmeric
338
Minor Spices
352
Nigella
356
Saffron
360
References
367

Anise
222
Star anise
228
Caraway
232
Coriander
243
Cumin
261
Dill
268
Glossary
389
European Spice Association Specifications of Quality Minima for Herbs and Spices
395
World Spice Harvest Calendar
396
Index
399
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

E. A. Weiss, Agricultural Adviser, Eaglemont, Victoria.