Spiritual Titanism: Indian, Chinese, and Western Perspectives

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SUNY Press, Mar 31, 2000 - Philosophy - 302 pages
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This work in comparative philosophy uses the concept of Titanism to critique certain trends in both Eastern and Western philosophy. Titanism is an extreme form of humanism in which human beings take on divine attributes and prerogatives. The author finds the most explicit forms of spiritual Titanism in the Jaina, Samkhya, and Yoga traditions, where yogis claim powers and knowledge that in the West are only attributed to God. These philosophies are also radically dualistic, and liberation involves a complete transcendence of the body, society, and nature. Five types of spiritual Titanism are identified; and, in addition to this typology, a heuristic based on Nietzsche's three metamorphoses of camel, lion, and child is offered. The book determines that answers to spiritual Titanism begin not only with the Hindu Goddess religion, but also are found in Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism, especially Zen Buddhism and Confucianism.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
TITANISM IN THE WEST
23
THE SELF
39
PROMETHEUS EAST
59
Human Titans in the Puranas
67
Conclusions
76
The Status of the Jaina Gods
82
Anekantavada and Gnostic Titanism
90
Conclusions
155
The Buddha Is Just the Buddha
161
Buddhas Lions
167
Conclusions
176
XUNZI AND NEOCONFUCIANISM
191
LAOZI ZHUANGZI
207
Zhuangzi and Postmodernism
215
NOTES
237

Conclusions
97
THE YOGI AND THE GODDESS
113
NEOVEDANTA
139
Vivekanandas Manly NeoVedanta
145

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About the author (2000)

Nicholas F. Gier is Professor of Philosophy and Coordinator of Religious Studies at the University of Idaho. He is the author of Wittgenstein and Phenomenology: A Comparative Study of the Later Wittgenstein, Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty, also published by SUNY Press, and God, Reason, and the Evangelicals: The Case Against Evangelical Rationalism.

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