Split Britches: Lesbian Practice/feminist Performance

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Sue-Ellen Case
Psychology Press, 1996 - Drama - 276 pages
The Split Britches theater company has defined postmodern lesbian/feminism on stage in the U.S. for the past decade and is arguably the single most important experimental theater company to have emerged during this time. Split Britches: Lesbian Practice/Feminist Performance is a long- awaited celebration of the theater and writing of Lois Weaver, Peggy Shaw, and Deb Margolin, who make up the troupe and who have won two Obies and other distinguished awards for their performance skills, ensemble work, and textual innovation. Their work addresses the central icons of high and popular culture from the perspective of lesbian and feminist gender twists and power inversions--from Weaver and Shaw's lip synching satires (Shaw's send-up of Perry Como, Weaver's Southern dish of Tammy Whynot), and their butch-femme seductions in Belle Reprieve, to Margolin's parodic stagings of a Jewish comedian in the vaudeville spectacle of Beauty and the Beast, to the queer challenges of transexuality in Lust and Comfort.
 

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Contents

Tableau vivant from Split Britches
37
Whats for dinner Della? DELLA Biscuits
46
The Beast argues with the Father
72
Beauty is called away from the Beast
83
Tammy Whynot and the Expectations
108
Performance of The Shanghai Gesture
112
Arriving in Heaven
122
Hilarious Louisa and Khurve survey the audience
123
Stanley in the famous Marlon Brando Tshirt pose with Stella
171
May and June singing When Hearts Are Passing in the Night
195
Dont laugh
212
The transgender arabesque
227
I knew you wouldnt be able to restrain yourself
239
Ill have to detach myself like an appliance with detachable parts LOIS Oh no I want the whole damn Hoover
246
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST 59
274
Copyright

Mitch and Stanley armwrestle as Blanche and Stella look on
162

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About the author (1996)

Sue-Ellen Case is Professor of English at the University of California, Riverside

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