St. Nicholas, Volume 35

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Scribner & Company, 1908 - Children's periodicals
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Page 98 - Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse ; The stockings were hung by the chimney with care, In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there...
Page 98 - Away to the window I flew like a flash, Tore open the shutters and threw up the sash. The moon on the breast of the new-fallen snow, Gave the lustre of midday to objects below, When, what to my wondering eyes should appear, But a miniature sleigh, and eight tiny reindeer, With a little old driver, so lively and quick, I knew in a moment it must be St.
Page 251 - When ei and ie both spell e, How can we tell which it shall be ? Here is a rule you may believe, That never, never will deceive, And all such troubles will relieve. A simpler rule you can't conceive. It is not made of many pieces, To puzzle daughters, sons, and nieces ; Yet with it all the trouble ceases. After c an e apply, After other letters i.
Page 199 - I pm Senators and Representatives will be received from 10 am to 12 m., excepting on Cabinet days. Visitors having business with the President will be admitted from 12 to I o'clock daily, excepting Cabinet days, so far as public business will permit.
Page 173 - ... long hairs gets more and more mottled with brown, the change in most cases that have come under my notice commencing at the back of the neck, on the feet and the under surface of the body, and in an astonishingly short time the dark summer coat is fairly resumed. Although belated snowstorms must often give them occasion to regret the loss of their winter coats, taking one year and another, the change seems to be wonderfully well timed, and at most they are really no worse off than those other...
Page 6 - Sailing, sailing over the bounding main, For many a stormy wind shall blow, Ere Jack comes home again; Sailing, sailing over the bounding main, For many a stormy wind shall blow, Ere Jack comes home again.
Page 98 - Gave the lustre of mid-day to objects below, When, what to my wondering eyes should appear, But a miniature sleigh, and eight tiny reindeer, With a little old driver, so lively and quick, I knew in a moment it must be St. Nick.
Page 173 - Then in March as the weather gets warmer the snow gradually disappears from the woods, the fur of the Northern hare, probably by reason of the wearing away of the tips and the shedding of the long hairs gets more and more mottled with brown, the change in most cases that have come under my notice commencing at the back of the neck, on the feet and the under surface of the body, and in an astonishingly short time the dark summer coat is fairly resumed. Although belated snowstorms must often give them...
Page 57 - Indians who went to get food were caught and publicly whipped. Soon after, an Indian was killed ; then three white men were wounded and a white mail-carrier killed. The chief, Emaltha, who was friendly to the treaty, was assassinated. The war had begun. It was now 1836 and Osceola was thirty years old.
Page 57 - ... became the real leader. He had two under-chiefs, one named Jumper and the other Alligator. They were as fierce and hated the white people as much as he did, and enjoyed doing all he told them to do. As Osceola grew older he had a fine, manly bearing and a deep, soft, musical voice. He quickly learned a new language, and he was very skilful in the use of the bow, though he liked better the white man's rifle with powder and ball. It is said he always hit what he aimed at. For fifteen years Osceola...

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