Staff Ride Handbook for the Battle of Perryville, 8 October 1862

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DIANE Publishing
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Contents

VII
1
VIII
2
IX
4
X
6
XII
8
XIII
15
XIV
19
XV
23
XXXIV
79
XXXV
81
XXXVI
87
XXXVII
88
XXXVIII
91
XXXIX
94
XL
99
XLI
104

XVI
25
XVII
31
XVIII
42
XIX
45
XX
49
XXI
50
XXII
52
XXIII
54
XXIV
55
XXV
57
XXVI
59
XXVII
61
XXVIII
62
XXIX
63
XXX
68
XXXI
72
XXXII
75
XXXIII
76
XLII
105
XLIII
111
XLIV
116
XLV
157
XLVI
189
XLVII
193
XLVIII
194
L
197
LI
203
LII
207
LIII
209
LIV
211
LV
235
LVI
237
LVII
239
LVIII
243
LIX
245

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Page 241 - ... and be halted by the instructor when they shall have passed at least six paces beyond the rank of file closers; the captain will place himself correctly on the line of battle, and will direct the alignment as the men of the front rank successively arrive; the covering sergeant will place himself behind the captain at the distance of the rear rank; the two men on the right of the front rank doubled, will continue to march, and passing beyond the covering sergeant and the captain, will turn to...
Page 112 - The 2d corps failing to find water at the place where it was expected to encamp on the night of the 7th, had to move off the road for that purpose, and consequently was some six miles or more further off than it would otherwise have been. The orders did not reach it in time, and these two causes delayed its arrival several hours. Still it was far enough advanced to have been pressed into the action on the 8th, if the necessity for it had been known early enough. " The engagement which terminated...
Page 112 - ... divisions of Generals Mitchell and Sheridan were moved into position to defeat it and hold the ground until the army was prepared to attack in force. A spirited attack was made on Colonel McCook's position, and was handsomely repulsed. Between ten and eleven o'clock the left corps arrived on the Maxville road. General McCook was instructed to get it promptly into position on the left of the center corps, and to make a reconnoissance to his front and left.
Page 112 - On discovering that the enemy was concentrating for battle at Perryville, I sent orders on the night of the 7th to General McCook and General Crittenden to march at three o'clock the following morning, so as to take position respectively, as early as possible, on the right and left of the centre corps, the commanders themselves to report in person for orders on their arrival, my intention being to make the attack that day if possible. The orders did not reach General McCook until half-past two o'clock,...
Page 192 - Union men and rebel soldiers were at that time lying in great suffering and destitution about Perryville and Harrodsburg. In addition to these, many had already been removed, and we had met numbers of those whose wounds were less severe walking and begging their way to Louisville, eighty-five miles distant.
Page 112 - I had somewhat expected an attack early in the morning on Gilbert's corps while it was isolated;" but the action was delayed until noon of the 8th, when a second corps of the enemy, McCook's, 18,000 strong, had reached the field, and at the close of the day Crittenden's corps was in action. It is stated in the official report of General Buell that "the effective force which advanced on Perryville...
Page 69 - ... more certain the better; that if the result is reasonably uncertain, battle is only to be sought when very serious disadvantage must result from a failure to fight or when the advantages of a possible victory far outweigh the consequences of probable defeat. These rules suppose that war has a higher object than that of mere bloodshed, and military history points for study and commendation to campaigns which have been conducted over a large field of operations with important results and without...
Page 117 - Finding the enemy indisposed to advance upon us, and knowing he was receiving heavy reinforcements, I deemed it best to assail him vigorously, and so directed. The engagement became general soon thereafter, and was continued furiously from that time to dark, our troops never faltering and never failing in their efforts.
Page 117 - SIR : — Finding the enemy pressing heavily in his rear, near Perryville, Major-general Hardee, of Folk's command, was obliged to halt and check him at that point. Having arrived at Harrodsburg from Frankfort, I determined to give him battle there, and accordingly concentrated three divisions of my old command — the army of the Mississippi, now under com* At this place, on September 26th, General Bragg issued another address " To the People of the Northwest," but it is of too great a length even...
Page 241 - ... behind the captain at the distance of the rear rank ; the two men on the right of the front rank doubled, will continue to march, and passing beyond the covering sergeant and the captain, will turn to the right ; after turning, they will continue to march elbow to elbow, and direct themselves towards the line of battle, but when they shall arrive at two paces from this line, the even number will shorten the step so that the odd number may precede him on the line, the odd number placing himself...

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