Manuel de Machinerie

Front Cover
SIU Press, Apr 18, 2007 - Performing Arts - 292 pages
Succinct and jargon free, Stage Rigging Handbook remains the only book in any language that covers the design, operation, and maintenance of stage-rigging equipment. It is written in an at-a-glance outline form, yet contains in-depth information available nowhere else. This fully indexed third edition includes three new parts: the first, an explanation of inspection procedures for rigging systems; the second, a discussion of training in the operation of rigging systems; and the third, essential information about the operation of fire curtains. The remaining six parts, as well as the glossary and bibliography, have been updated. This edition also contains a new preface, many new illustrations, and expanded information on Nicopress terminations.
Glerum explains that four main principles make up the core of this book: know the rigging system; keep it in safe working order; know how to use it; and keep your concentration. Glerum applies these principles to all of the major types of stage rigging systems, including block and tackle, hemp, counterweight, and motorized. He describes each type of rigging, then thoroughly reviews the operating procedures and methods of inspecting existing systems.
 

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The book is very good because it has contain practical problems
It is compulsory for all safety engineers.

Contents

Part 1 Loads and Reactions
1
102 Knowing the Rigging System
2
103 Supporting a Load
3
B SeatofthePants Experience
4
D Summation of Forces
5
E Moment of Force
7
F Examples
9
G Continuous Beams
12
B Sizing
133
C Head Blocks
134
D Tension Block
135
407 Lock Rail
136
B Lock Adjustment
137
A Guide Systems
139
B Pipe Weight
141
410 Loading Bridge
142

104 Summation of Forces
13
B The Law of Sines
14
C Table of Multipliers for Resultant Forces
15
D Vectors
16
105 Bridle Analysis
17
A BridleLength Calculation
18
B Vertical and Horizontal Forces
19
C Bridle Tension
21
D Vector Analysis
22
E Hanging Points of Different Heights
23
F Ratio of Horizontal to Vertical Distance
26
G Allowable Loads
28
106 Strength of Materials
29
A Types of Applied Forces
30
B Stress Strain and Hookes Law
31
C Yield Point and Elasticity
32
D Breaking Point
33
E Allowable Deflection
34
F Torsion
35
H Design Factor of Components
38
Part 2 BlockandTackle Rigging
42
202 Anatomy of a BlockandTackle System
43
A Wooden Blocks
44
C Other Types of Blocks
45
B Dynamic Load
47
204 Mechanical Advantage
49
C Calculating LeadLine Pull
52
D Mechanical Advantage of Common Systems
55
E Calculating the Total Load on the System
57
G Mechanical Advantage of Complex Systems
58
205 Lacing and Reeving of Blocks
59
206 Inspecting a BlockandTackle System
61
207 Using a BlockandTackle System
62
C Operating
63
Part 3 Hemp Rigging
65
B MultipleLine System
66
C Sandbag and Arbor Attachment as Counterweight
68
303 The Rope
69
B Types of NaturalFiber Rope
70
C SyntheticFiber Rope
71
D Tensile Strength or Breaking Strength
73
F Effects of Knotting
75
H Indications of Wear
79
I Testing a Rope
80
J Bosuns Chair
81
304 Blocks
82
B Loads
85
C Head Blocks
86
D Loft Blocks
88
305 Pin Rail
92
F Tying Off
94
306 Sandbags and Arbors
97
A Attaching Sandbags and Arbors with a Sunday
99
B Attaching Sandbags and Arbors with a Trim Clamp
100
307 Jack Line
101
B Positioning Head Blocks
102
D Aligning Blocks
103
E Running Rope
104
B Untying a Line Set
106
D Removing Loads
107
F Lashing with Small Tie Line
108
G Retrimming
109
I Showtime Operation
110
Part 4 Counterweight Rigging
112
402 SinglePurchase Counterweight System
113
403 DoublePurchase Counterweight System
114
404 Miscellaneous Hardware
115
405 Wire Rope
116
B Construction of Wire Rope
119
C Grades of Wire Rope
120
D Attaching to Batten and Arbor
124
E Indications of Wear
130
406 Blocks
132
C Identifying Load Limits and Weights
144
B Communications
152
D Loading
153
B Unbalanced Large Loads
154
413 Showtime Operation
159
D Preshow Testing
161
414 Special CounterweightRigging Problems
162
C Increasing Counterweight Capacity
163
415 Operation Summary
164
Part 5 Motorized Rigging
166
502 Systems Descriptions
167
B DeadHaul Winch Types
173
503 Motor Types
175
504 ElectricWinch Components
177
B Gear Reducer
178
D Drum
179
F Rigging Components
183
506 Hand Winch
184
507 Operation of Motorized Rigging
185
A Safety Inspection of All Components
186
D Showtime Operation
187
Part 6 Cutting and Terminating Rope Attaching Loads and Dealing with Special Problems
189
B Knots
191
602 Wire Rope
194
B Unreeling and Uncoiling
195
603 Terminating
196
B Compression Sleeves
202
C Trim Chains
214
604 Bolts
215
605 Attaching Loads
216
B Drops
217
C Vertical Framed Scenery
218
D Horizontal Framed Scenery
221
E Point Loads
222
606 Special Problems
224
B Tripping
225
C Guiding
226
Part 7 Inspection of Rigging Systems
229
A Daily
230
703 Preparation
231
704 What to Look For
232
F Corrosion
233
706 FireCurtainInspection Checklist
235
707 HempSystemInspection Checklist
236
708 CounterweightInspection Checklist
237
709 MotorizedInspection Checklist
240
710 Installation Checklists
241
A Termination Instructions
242
C MotorizedSystem Checklist
244
D HandWinch Checklist
245
F BrailFireCurtain Checklist
246
Part 8 Operation and Training
248
802 VenueSpecific Training
249
A Paperwork
250
E MidRail JumpRail Operation
251
J Grid Operation
252
Part 9 Fire Curtains
253
902 Codes and Regulations
254
B Life Safety Code
255
903 Water Curtains
256
904 Fabric Curtains
257
C Curtain Construction
259
905 Operation Devices
260
B ManualRelease Devices
261
C AutomaticRelease Devices
262
D Overbalance Systems
264
E Deceleration Devices
270
906 Motorized Fire Curtains
272
Glossary
275
Selected Bibliography
279
Index
283
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Jay O. Glerum holds seminars on stage rigging throughout the United States, Canada, and Europe. A fellow of the United States Institute for Theatre Technology, he has served as chair of the Rigging and Stage Machinery Standards Committee of the Institute and has taught at Seattle University, Marquette University, and the University of Washington. He is president of Jay O. Glerum & Associates, Inc., a firm specializing in consulting for the entertainment industry.

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