Standard Methods of Chemical Analysis: A Manual of Analytical Methods and General Reference for the Analytical Chemist and for the Advanced Student, Volume 1

Front Cover
Wilfred Welday Scott
D. Van Nostrand Company, 1922 - Chemistry, Analytic - 1567 pages
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Contents

BiOCl as the oxide Bi2O3 a by precipitation as the basic nitrate 6 subcarbonate
78
methodsdistillation of methyl borate and fixation with lime 8485 Volumetric
86
BROMINE
92
CADMIUM
99
Preparation and solution of the samplelimestone dolomite mag
105
tion from iron by the cupric potassium chloride method 110111 Gravimetric method
121
mination of carbon dioxide by measuring the gas 123 126 reference Determination
132
of cerium Determination of cerium in Welsbach mantles colorimetric method
138
WILFRED W SCOTT
142
free chlorine 149151 Determination of hypochlorouB acid in presence of chlorine
151
diphenyj carbazide 156 Estimation 156 Preparation and solution of the sample
161
Preparation and solution of the samplegeneral procedure
167
betanaphthol method electrolytic deposition of metallic cobalt 169 Determina
173
and subsequent groups removal of silver removal of bismuth lead mercury arsenic
197
tion of impurities in blister copperbismuth iron lead zinc nickel cobalt arsenic
206
FLUORINE
212
Preparation and solution of the samplesolubilities organic
224
Pristcr i s l Moir 233234 Preparation of proof gold Furnace methodrefer
234
Preparation and solution of the sample iodides of silver copper
244
Preparation and solution of the samplesolubilities
250
methods for determining small amounts of ironwith sulphocyanate with salicylic
268
determination as peroxide PbOj 274276 Volumetric methodsferrocyanide method
290
test sodium carbonate and nitrate tests 295 Estimationoccurrence 295 Prepara
306
Gravimetric methodsprecipitation as sulphide determination by electrolysis Hollo
312
Preparation and solution of the samplesolubilities decom
314
Determination of commonly occurring substances in molybdenum oresarsenic
320
NICKEL
329
procedure for decomposing ores fusion methods solution of metallic nickel and
336
bined tests for Nitric acidferrous sulphate test diphenylamine test copper test
341
sulphate difference method 409410 Methods for the determination of potassium
418
Estimationoccurrence of selenium and tellurium 421 Preparation and solution
424
iodide hydrogen sulphide etc 384385 EstimationPreparation and solution
425
SILICON
431
silicon carbide carborundum sulphides iron pyrites slags and roasted ores 432435
438
method combination methods Denigcs cyanide method miscellaneous volumetric
448
WILFRED W SCOTT Editor
451
WILFRED W SCOTT Editor
479
method of fusion 4f7 Cupellation 472 Parting 478 Combination methods
481
Determination of gold in cyanide solution 4S5 Summary
488
sulphide metallic zinc 387 EstimationPreparation and solution of the sample
496
moisture available sulphur ash arsenic and chlorine 519 Quantitative estimation
520
W S SELLERS
525
process method determination as sulphide 530 532 Volumetric determination
536
Preparation and solution of the sampleelement oxides salts of titaniumgeneral
543
Colorimetric determination of titanium with hydrogen peroxide colorimetric deter
553
Technical Director Ledoux
554
acids minerals steel and alloys steel containing a high percentage of tungsten ferro
565
arsenic 566 tin 567 copper 569 manganese 570 Analysis of tungsten metal
573
occurrence industrial application 578 Preparation and solution of the sample
580
carbonate separation from vanadium 579580 Gravimetric determinations
582
acid separation of vanadium from chromium 586 587 Gravimetric methodsdeter
596
Assistant Chief of Testing Department
597
Volumetric methodsferrocyanide titration of the acid solution separating iron
610
ganese lime magnesia alkalies copper barium 614616 Analysis of fused zinc
617
Separation of the basesAnalysis of the solution 628 629 Tests
654
Hydrochloric acidFerguson 660 VI Hydrochloric acidLunge and Marchlewski
662
of gas flow other data formulae for calculating areas of plane figurestriangle rectangle
710
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Page 708 - British thermal unit (Btu) = l/180partof the heat required to raise the temperature of one pound of water from 32 F.
Page 304 - ... through will vitiate the result by reacting with the excess of ferrous sulphate. As soon as the filtration and washing are completed, the ferrous sulphate should be added and the excess titrated with the permanganate solution, as the permanganic acid gradually decomposes on standing, and the warmer the solution the more rapid is the decomposition. At a temperature of 5 C. the solution will remain unaltered for several hours, but at 40 C. fifteen minutes will show an appreciable change. The...
Page 404 - After settling, decant the solution into a porcelain dish or hard glass beaker. Very small quantities of the sediment passing over will do no harm. Wash the insoluble residue onto a filter with hot water and continue the washing until free from chlorids, adding the washings to the original solution for evaporation. Oxidize the organic matter present in the solution with a few drops of nitric acid and evaporate to dryness on a water bath. Take up with hot water and a few cubic centimeters of hydrochloric...
Page 675 - ALLOWANCE FOR TEMPERATURE The coefficient of expansion for Ammonia Solutions, varying with the temperature, correction must be applied according to the following table: Corrections to be added for each degree below 60 F.
Page 581 - ... per cent lead acetate solution, and enough of a strong solution of ammonium acetate to neutralize the nitric acid present and substitute acetic acid for it. The object is to precipitate the vanadium as lead vanadate in an acetic acid solution. The ammonium acetate solution may be made by mixing 80 cc of strong ammonia, 100 cc of water, and 70 cc of acetic acid 99 per cent pure.
Page 709 - The specific gravity of a substance is the ratio of the weight of a given volume of that substance to the weight of an equal volume of another substance, whose specific gravity is assumed to be unity (1).
Page 280 - If the material dissolves in water, the water solution is treated with 5 cc. of concentrated hydrochloric acid and a few crystals of potassium chlorate and the liquor boiled.
Page 284 - B can be seen, thus preventing interference of light reflected from the vertical sides of the tubes A and B. A person looking through the eye-piece observes a single circular field divided vertically by an almost imperceptible line when the two solutions are of the same intensity. By manipulating the plunger D, the level of the liquid in B can be easily raised or lowered, thus causing the right half of the image to assume a darker or lighter shade at will. In matching colors with an ascending column...
Page 288 - C" is washed into a beaker and acidified with 20 cc. of nitric acid and 5 cc. of hydrochloric acid. The solution is evaporated to dryness on the steam bath. The residue is dissolved in 200 cc.
Page 323 - ... gram Water 1000 cc. VOLUMETRIC METHOD. The molybdenum sulphide precipitates and papers are treated in a 250 cc. beaker with 6 cc. of sulphuric acid and 10 cc. of nitric acid, and the liquid is boiled until strong fumes of sulphur trioxide are emitted. After allowing it to cool, 5 cc. of nitric acid are added, and the evaporation is repeated. The evaporation with 5 cc. portions of strong nitric acid is repeated several times, until the filter paper has been completely destroyed and all traces...

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