State Enterprise Zone Programs: Have They Worked?

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W.E. Upjohn Institute, 2002 - Political Science - 345 pages
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Annotation Enterprise zones have been part of American urban policy for over 20 years. In this book, the authors (urban and regional planning, the University of Iowa) use a hypothetical firm methodology to measure the value of enterprise zone incentives to business, involving construction of a set of financial statements for typical firms and application of tax code and incentives to those firms. They briefly discuss this model (with technical information on the model included in an appendix), and look at the results of enterprise zone programs in place in 13 states. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
 

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Contents

1 Introduction
1
2 Enterprise Zones and EconomicDevelopment Policy
21
3 How Valuable Are Zone Incentives to Firms?
53
4 How Taxes and Incentives Favor One Industry over Another and Capital over Labor
85
5 The Fiscal Effects of Incentives
103
6 Manufacturing Growth and Decline in Enterprise Zones
127
7 Enterprise Zones Incentives and Local Economic Growth
157
8 Enterprise Zones and Access to Employment
197
The Tax Elasticity of Employment and Fiscal BreakEven
265
The SSEL Data
271
Translating Enterprise Zone Boundaries and Tax Characteristics of Zones
279
Detailed Results
287
GravityBased Commuting Models
303
Enterprise Zones and Commuting
305
References
313
The Authors
325

9 Conclusions and Policy Recommendations
217
Details of the TAIMez Model
239
Do HighUnemployment Places Have Lower Business Taxes? A Comparison of Results from TAIM and TAIMez
257
Subject Index
327
About the Institute
345
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About the author (2002)

Alan Peters is a professor of urban and regional planning at the University of Iowa. Heather MacDonald is an associate professor of urban and regional planning at the University of Iowa, where she has served as chair of the planning program. They both live in Iowa City, Iowa.

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