State Profiles: The Population and Economy of Each U.S. State 2009

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Mary Meghan Ryan
Bernan Press, Jan 16, 2010 - Business & Economics - 462 pages
State Profiles: The Population and Economy of Each U.S. State provides a wealth of current, authoritative, and comprehensive data on key demographic and economic indicators for each U.S. state and the District of Columbia. Each state is covered by a compact standardized chapter that allows for easy comparisons and timely analysis between the states. The data come from a variety of sources including: _ Bureau of Economic Analysis _ Bureau of Labor Statistics _ Census Bureau _ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention _ Energy Information Agency _ Federal Bureau of Investigation _ International Trade Administration _ National Center for Education Statistics _ Federal Bureau of Investigation _ U.S. Department of Agriculture An 8-page profile for each U.S. state plus the District of Columbia provides reliable, up-to-date information on a wide range of topics, including: _ Population and labor force _ Income and poverty _ Government finances _ Economic structure _ Crime _ Education _ Health insurance coverage _ Voting _ Marital status _ Agriculture _ And more A Few Examples of the Type of Data That Can Be Found In State Profiles: _ In 2008, unemployment ranged from a low of 3.0 percent in South Dakota to a high of 8.4 percent in Michigan. Nationally, the unemployment rate was 5.8 percent _ Voter turnout for the 2008 presidential election varied widely by state. The District of Columbia and Minnesota had the highest rates each with around 75 percent of eligible voter turning outs, while Hawaii and Utah had among the lowest voter turnout both around 52 percent. _ Nevada was the fastest growing state from 2000 to 2008 growing by 30.1 percent, followed by Arizona at 26.7 percent. Only two states_Louisiana and North Dakota_saw a decline in their population from 2000 to 2008. _ In 2007, 25.2 percent of all people in Texas were not covered by health insurance_the highest in the country. In contrast, only 5.2 percent of people in Massachusetts were not covered by health insurance. If you want a single source of key demographic and economic data on each of the U.S. states , there is no other book or Web site like State Profiles. In addition, this book provides an overview of the U.S. economy which provides a framework for understanding the state information. This book is primarily useful for public, school, and college and university libraries, as well as for economic and sociology departments. However, anyone needing state-level information-students, state officials, investors, economic analysts, concerned citizens-will find State Profiles wealth of data and analysis absolutely essential!
 

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Contents

United States
1
United States Rankings
3
Alabama
13
Alaska
21
Arizona
29
Arkansas
37
California
45
Colorado
53
Montana
221
Nebraska
229
Nevada
237
New Hampshire
245
New Jersey
253
New Mexico
261
New York
269
North Carolina
277

Connecticut
61
Delaware
69
District of Columbia
77
Florida
85
Georgia
93
Hawaii
101
Idaho
109
Illinois
117
Indiana
125
Iowa
133
Kansas
141
Kentucky
149
Louisiana
157
Maine
165
Maryland
173
Massachusetts
181
Michigan
189
Minnesota
197
Mississippi
205
Missouri
213
North Dakota
285
Ohio
293
Oklahoma
301
Oregon
309
Pennsylvania
317
Rhode Island
325
South Carolina
333
South Dakota
341
Tennessee
349
Texas
357
Utah
365
Vermont
373
Virginia
381
Washington
389
West Virginia
397
Wisconsin
405
Wyoming
413
Notes and Definitions
421
Index
431
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Mary Meghan Ryan is a senior research editor for Bernan Press. She is also the editor for the Handbook of U.S. Labor Statistics: Employment, Earnings, Prices, Productivity, and Other Labor Data; Employment, Hours, and Earnings: States and Areas; and Vital Statistics of the United States: Births, Life Expectancy, Deaths, and Selected Health Data. In addition, she serves as the associate editor for Business Statistics of the United States: Patterns of Economic Change.

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