State of Denial

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, Oct 2, 2006 - History - 480 pages
"Insurgents and terrorists retain the resources and capabilities to sustain and even increase current level of violence through the next year." This was the secret Pentagon assessment sent to the White House in May 2006. The forecast of a more violent 2007 in Iraq contradicted the repeated optimistic statements of President Bush, including one, two days earlier, when he said we were at a "turning point" that history would mark as the time "the forces of terror began their long retreat."

State of Denial examines how the Bush administration avoided telling the truth about Iraq to the public, to Congress, and often to themselves. Two days after the May report, the Pentagon told Congress, in a report required by law, that the "appeal and motivation for continued violent action will begin to wane in early 2007."

In this detailed inside story of a war-torn White House, Bob Woodward reveals how White House Chief of Staff Andrew Card, with the indirect support of other high officials, tried for 18 months to get Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld replaced. The president and Vice President Cheney refused. At the beginning of Bush's second term, Stephen Hadley, who replaced Condoleezza Rice as national security adviser, gave the administration a "D minus" on implementing its policies. A SECRET report to the new Secretary of State Rice from her counselor stated that, nearly two years after the invasion, Iraq was a "failed state."

State of Denial reveals that at the urging of Vice President Cheney and Rumsfeld, the most frequent outside visitor and Iraq adviser to President Bush is former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, who, haunted still by the loss in Vietnam, emerges as a hidden and potent voice.

Woodward reveals that the secretary of defense himself believes that the system of coordination among departments and agencies is broken, and in a SECRET May 1, 2006, memo, Rumsfeld stated, "the current system of government makes competence next to impossible."

State of Denial answers the core questions: What happened after the invasion of Iraq? Why? How does Bush make decisions and manage a war that he chose to define his presidency? And is there an achievable plan for victory?

Bob Woodward's third book on President Bush is a sweeping narrative -- from the first days George W. Bush thought seriously about running for president through the recruitment of his national security team, the war in Afghanistan, the invasion and occupation of Iraq, and the struggle for political survival in the second term.

After more than three decades of reporting on national security decision making -- including his two #1 national bestsellers on the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, Bush at War (2002) and Plan of Attack (2004) -- Woodward provides the fullest account, and explanation, of the road Bush, Cheney, Rumsfeld, Rice and the White House staff have walked.
 

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User Review  - question9 - Overstock.com

This was a gift a while ago. It gets between 3&4 stars on average from reviews. If you do want to read about this subject it seems that it would be interesting and informative. The gift recipient requested it specifically. Read full review

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User Review  - keylawk - LibraryThing

Woodward's third book on President Bush II. The narrative begins from the first days George W. voiced his inclination to run -- even though no other candidate in history had less actual service or ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
10
Section 3
17
Section 4
28
Section 5
38
Section 6
49
Section 7
57
Section 8
66
Section 25
268
Section 26
283
Section 27
294
Section 28
305
Section 29
315
Section 30
328
Section 31
338
Section 32
353

Section 9
75
Section 10
86
Section 11
97
Section 12
111
Section 13
120
Section 14
135
Section 15
147
Section 16
156
Section 17
166
Section 18
178
Section 19
190
Section 20
204
Section 21
213
Section 22
227
Section 23
240
Section 24
254
Section 33
367
Section 34
377
Section 35
386
Section 36
394
Section 37
403
Section 38
412
Section 39
421
Section 40
431
Section 41
440
Section 42
452
Section 43
461
Section 44
471
Section 45
480
Section 46
493
Section 47
523
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Bob Woodward is an associate editor at The Washington Post, where he has worked for forty-seven years. He has shared in two Pulitzer Prizes, first for the Post’s coverage of the Watergate scandal with Carl Bernstein, and second in 2003 as the lead reporter for coverage of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. He has authored or coauthored eighteen books, all of which have been national nonfiction bestsellers. Twelve of those have been #1 national bestsellers.

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