Statistics for People who (think They) Hate Statistics: Excel 2007 Edition

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SAGE, 2010 - Social Science - 399 pages
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Utilizing the personable and clear approach that made Statistics for People Who (Think They) Hate Statistics a bestseller, Neil J. Salkind focuses on the use of Excel as the primary analytic tool in the Second Edition of Statistics for People Who Think They Hate Statistics – Excel 2007 Edition. Salkind walks readers through various statistical procedures, beginning with correlations and graphical representation of data and ending with inferential techniques and analysis of variance. Throughout the book, he reveals the full capabilities of Excel, beginning with Part I, which is an introduction to Excel to the end, where he presents an extensive overview of Excel functionality.

Key Features of the Second Edition:

  • Reflects all Excel material based on Excel 2007 including all screen grabs
  • Moves the reliability and validity chapter forward
  • Offers more examples throughout the text and more end of chapter exercises
  • Includes new and updated icons to explore certain topics in detail
  • Presents the answers to the Time to Practice exercises to follow in chapter rather than at end of book
  • Contains an Appendix detailing the differences between Excel 2003 to Excel 2007
  • Incorporates the use of the new Data Analysis Toolpak option
  • Covers formulas and functions in more detail

Robust Ancillaries

The password-protected Instructor Resources Site at www.sagepub.com/salkind2einstr includes:

  • Chapter Overviews
  • PowerPoint presentations
  • Data sets
  • Questions and activities
  • Test questions with answers
  • SAGE journal articles & Web resources
  • Sample Syllabi

The student study site at http://www.sagepub.com/salkind2study contains

  • Data sets for Excel 97-2003
  • Data sets for Excel 2007
  • Time for Practice data sets
  • Journal articles
  • Chapter overview/objectives
  • Questions and activities
  • Web resources

Intended Audience

This text is designed for students taking Introduction to Statistics courses in applied disciplines, especially in business & management and the human services.

Praise for Neil Salkind and Statistics for People Who (Think They) Hate Statistics

“Salkind's book is in a class by itself. It is easily the best book of its kind that I have come across. I enthusiastically recommend it for anyone interested in the subject, and even (and especially) for those who aren't!” -Russ Shafer-Landau, Professor, University of Wisconsin

“Your book Statistics for People Who (Think They) Hate Statistics has cleared up confusion and partial understandings that I have had for years. It is a must for anyone beginning or continuing their journey in this science. I love it, and will use it for all of the foreseeable future.” -Ronald A. Straube, Performance Improvement Coordinator, Mission Regional Medical Center

“Salkind's examples assist with the application of key concepts and tests. The book is easy to read due to the way information is presented-such as the Tech Talk, Things to Remember, the Key to Difficul

 

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I got this book for a stats class. I ordered it a day before class and recieved it by the second week of class. Overstock is great bc of low shipping costs. Read full review

Contents

II
4
III
39
IV
41
V
66
VI
81
VIII
113
IX
137
X
159
XIX
282
XX
292
XXI
311
XXII
321
XXIV
328
XXVI
337
XXVII
338
XXVIII
343

XI
161
XII
175
XIII
199
XIV
201
XV
218
XVI
237
XVII
251
XVIII
268
XXX
346
XXXI
352
XXXIII
366
XXXV
375
XXXVI
377
XXXVII
387
XXXVIII
399
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About the author (2010)

Neil J. Salkind received his PhD from the University of Maryland in Human Development, and after teaching for 35 years at the University of Kansas, he remains as a Professor Emeritus in the Department of Psychology and Research in Education, where he continues to collaborate with colleagues and work with students. His early interests were in the area of children s cognitive development, and after research in the areas of cognitive style and (what was then known as) hyperactivity, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of North Carolina s Bush Center for Child and Family Policy. His work then changed direction and the focus was on child and family policy, specifically the impact of alternative forms of public support on various child and family outcomes. He has delivered more than 150 professional papers and presentations; written more than 100 trade and textbooks; and is the author of "Statistics for People Who (Think They) Hate Statistics" (SAGE)", Theories of Human Development "(SAGE), and "Exploring Research "(Prentice Hall). He has edited several encyclopedias, including the "Encyclopedia of Human Development, " the "Encyclopedia of Measurement and Statistics, " and the recently published "Encyclopedia of Research Design. "He was editor of "Child Development Abstracts and Bibliography" for 13 years and lives in Lawrence, Kansas, where he likes to read, swim with the River City Sharks, bake brownies (see the Excel version of "Statistics for People" . . . for the recipe at http: //www.statisticsforpeople.com), and poke around old Volvos and old houses.

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