The World of Yesterday's Humanist Today: Proceedings of the Stefan Zweig Symposium

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SUNY Press, 1983 - Psychology - 357 pages
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Fifty years ago, Stefan Zweig, who committed suicide in 1942, was the most widely read and translated living writer in the world. Zweig's Vienna was a world of bright, brittle superficialities, in which the bourgeoisie "gradually elevated the eternal business of seeing and being seen to the purpose of the existence." To break through the facades of this society, Zweig developed a remarkable literary and psychological method.

In The World of Yesterday's Humanist Today, thirty scholars of history, literature, and music share their studies of Zweig and their insight into his works.
 

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Contents

Stefan Zweigs and Romain Rollands Struggle for PanEuropean Unity
18
The Man of the Hour and the Consistent Humanist
30
Friendship and Kinship between Georges Duhamel and Stefan Zweig
38
A Study of the Family of Stefan Zweig and Jewish Social Mobility 17501880
62
Stefan Zweig and the Illusion of the Jewish European
80
Stefan Zweig and Judaism
109
Stefan Zweigs Sternstunden der Menschheit
116
Historical Destiny and Individual Action in Stefan Zweigs Vision of History
126
Stefan Zweig and Emil Ludwig
234
A Wanderer between Two Worlds
244
a Contribution Factor to Stefan Zweigs Suicide
252
Brazil As Seen by Stefan Zweig
260
Stefan Zweigs Last Days
267
An Encounter
274
The Zweigs and Gabriela Mistral in Petropolis
280
Some Revelations About Stefan Zweigs Presence in Brazil
287

Some Complications and Limitations
155
Narrative Technique and Psychological Analysis in Two Novellas by Stefan Zweig
166
Portrayal of the Elderly in Stefan Zweigs Novella Vierundzwanzig Stunden aus dem Leben einer Frau
175
Zweig As Dramatist
184
The Spirit of Humanism as Reflected in Stefan Zweigs Dramatic Works
193
Stefan Zweigs Big Balzac
208
New Evidence
215
Politics and Psychology of Die Schweigsame Frau
225
The Burning Secret of Stephen Branch or A Cautionary Tale About a Physician Who Could Not Heal Himself
300
Zweig in Film
312
Comments on Letter from an Unknown Woman
318
An Update
322
Symposium Program
339
Index
342
Copyright

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About the author (1983)

James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851) was a famed nineteenth century American author known for his work in fiction particularly sea stories and historical novels and politics. He enrolled in Yale University, never earned a degree but later joined the United States Navy. Some of his most famous works include Last of the Mohicans, A Letter to my Countymen, and Ned Myers' or A Life before the Mast.

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