Stetkevych, Jaroslav: Zephyrs of Najd

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University of Chicago Press, Dec 15, 1993 - Literary Criticism - 326 pages
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Arabs have traditionally considered classical Arabic poetry, together with the Qur'an, as one of their supreme cultural accomplishments. Taking a comparatist approach, Jaroslav Stetkevych attempts in this book to integrate the classical Arabic lyric into an enlarged understanding of lyric poetry as a genre.

Stetkevych concentrates on the "places of lost bliss" that furnish the dominant motif in the lyric-elegiac opening section (nasib) of the classic Arab code, or qusidah. In defining the Arabic lyrical genre, he shows how pre-Islamic lamentations over abandoned campsites evolved, in Arabo-Islamic mystical poetry, into expressions of spiritual nostalgia. Stetkevych also draws intriguing parallels between the highlands of Najd in Arabic poetry and Arcadia in the European tradition. He concludes by exploring the degree to which the pastoral-paradisiacal archetype of the nasib pervades Arabic literary perception, from the pre-Islamic ode through the Thousand and One Nights and later texts.

Enhanced by Stetkevych's sensitive translations of all the Arabic texts discussed, The Zephyrs of Najd brings the classical Arabic ode fully into the purview of contemporary literary and critical discourse.
 

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Contents

The Qasidah as SonataThe Nasib as Sonata Form
16
Toward the Ternary Archetype
26
Hassan Ibn Thabit
59
Silences and Voices of the Desert from
74
THREE
103
The Topology of Nostalgia
114
FOUR
135
Toward a Cosmic Pastoral Space
142
FIVE
168
Perceived Lost Remembered
180
Notes
235
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About the author (1993)

Jaroslav Stetkevych was a professor of Arabic in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago from 1962 to 1996. He is also the author of The Modern Arabic Literary Language: Lexical and Stylistic Developments and Muhammad and the Golden Bough: Reconstructing Arabian Myth.

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