Stories of American discoverers for little Americans

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American Book Co., 1910 - America - 176 pages
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Page 180 - In the SCHOOL GEOGRAPHY a special feature is the presentation of the basal principles of physical and general geography in simple, untechnical language, arranged in numbered paragraphs. In subsequent pages constant reference is made to these principles, but in each case accompanied by the paragraph number. This greatly simplifies the work, and makes it possible to take up the formal study of these introductory lessons after the remainder of the book has been completed. With a view to enriching the...
Page 180 - The text is clear, simple, interesting, and explicit. The pictures are distinguished for their aptness and perfect illustrative character. Two sets of maps are provided, one for reference, and the other for study, the latter having corresponding maps drawn to the same scale. ^f The INTRODUCTORY GEOGRAPHY develops the subject in accordance with the child's comprehension, each lesson paving the way for the next.
Page 182 - From the start lessons in writing language are employed simultaneously with those in conversation; and picture study, study of literary selections, and letter writing are presented at frequent intervals. The lessons are of a proper length, well arranged and well graded.
Page 181 - THESE readers form a good all-round basal series, suitable for use in any school ; but they will appeal to teachers particularly, because of their very easy gradation. Both in thought and expression, the books are so carefully graded that each selection is but slightly more difficult than the preceding one, and there is no real gap anywhere.
Page 180 - In two parts, each . . .40 In two parts, each . .75 IN the new series of these sterling geographies emphasis is laid on industrial, commercial, and political geography, with just enough physiography to bring out the causal relations. ^[ The text is clear, simple, interesting, and explicit. The pictures are distinguished for their aptness and perfect illustrative character. Two sets of maps are provided, one for reference, and the other for study, the latter having corresponding maps drawn to the...
Page 180 - The INTRODUCTORY GEOGRAPHY develops the subject in accordance with the child's comprehension, each lesson paving the way for the next. In the treatment of the United States the physiographic, historical, political, industrial, and commercial conditions are taken up in their respective order, the chief industries and the loc lities devoted largely to each receiving more than usual consideration.
Page 178 - History has been entirely rewritten in a series of biographies by that charming writer for children, Dr. James Baldwin. The School History has been completely revised, and gives greater prominence to the life of the people, and to the wonderful development of our industries. EGGLESTON'S NEW CENTURY HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES . . . $1.00 ^[ The author's purpose was to tell the story of our country so briefly that it might be mastered within the usual time allotted to the study, and yef to preserve...
Page 44 - Amazons which seemed to realize the classic legends of antiquity, to stories of Patagonian giants, to flaming pictures of an El Dorado, where the sands sparkled with gems, and golden pebbles as large as birds' eggs were dragged in nets out of the rivers.
Page 181 - Although a wide variety of reading matter is provided, good literature, embodying child interests, has been considered of fundamental importance. Lessons of a similar nature are grouped together, and topics relating to kindred subjects recur somewhat regularly. All are designed to quicken the child's observation, and increase his appreciation. ^[ By the use of this series, the child will be taught to read in such a manner as will appeal to his interests, and at the same time he will be made acquainted...
Page 180 - ... the physiographic, historical, political, industrial, and commercial conditions are taken up in their respective order, the chief industries and the localities devoted largely to each receiving more than usual consideration. The country is regarded as being divided into five industrial sections. ^[ In the SCHOOL GEOGRAPHY a special feature is the presentation of the basal principles of physical and general geography in simple, untcchnical language, arranged in numbered paragraphs.

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