Street-cleaning and the Disposal of a City's Wastes: Methods and Results and the Effect Upon Public Health, Public Morals, and Municipal Property

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Doubleday & McClure, 1897 - Street cleaning - 230 pages
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Page 91 - And to remove from said city or otherwise dispose of, as often as the public health and use of the streets may require, all street sweepings, ashes and garbage and to remove the newly fallen snow from leading thoroughfares and such other streets and avenues as may be found practicable.
Page 25 - Board of Conference will be on a perfect equality. It will establish its own Organization and Rules of Procedure, and will elect one of its members Permanent Chairman and another Permanent Secretary, one of these to be chosen from the five Officers and another from the five Spokesmen. '"It is hoped that this Board will be able to settle every question that may come up, to the satisfaction of all concerned, because most differences can be adjusted by discussions in which both sides are fairly represented....
Page iii - AND THE DISPOSAL OF A CITY'S WASTES: METHODS AND RESULTS AND THE EFFECT UPON PUBLIC HEALTH, PUBLIC MORALS, AND MUNICIPAL PROSPERITY.
Page 13 - Whatever the cause, no one will now question that the former condition of the streets was bad— very bad. No one can question the truth of the following description: Before 1895 the streets were almost universally in a filthy state. In wet weather they were covered with slime, and in dry weather the air was filled with dust. Artificial sprinkling in summer converted the dust into mud, and the drying winds changed the mud to powder. Rubbish...
Page 183 - We, who are soon to be citizens of New York, the largest city on the American continent, desire to have her possess a name which is above reproach. We, therefore, agree to keep from littering her streets, and, as far as possible, to prevent others from doing the same, in order that our City may be as clean as she is great and as pure as she is free.
Page 27 - ... Street Cleaning, where political preference was the only rule they had ever known, had never entered their minds. In fact, they were warned by skeptics, both outside of the Department and among themselves, to " look out for Waring; this is one of his tricks." That any Commissioner of Street Cleaning, even though he were an " angel," should honestly intend, and honestly endeavor to deal fairly with the rank and file of those under him, was too much to believe. There must, they thought, be some...
Page 25 - The General Committee will meet in a room to be provided for them, at 2 PM on every Thursday, except the third Thursday of each month. The members will not have their time docked for this. Their meetings will be secret, and they will be expected to discuss with perfect freedom everything connected with their work, their relations with the Commissioner and his subordinates, and all questions of discipline, duties, pay, etc., in which they are interested, or which the Sections, Stables and Dumps may...
Page 25 - Cleaning,' reading as follows: " ' In order to establish friendly and useful relations between the men in the Working Force and the Officers of the Department, I shall be glad to see an Organization formed among the men for the discussion of all matters of interest. "'This Organization will be represented by five Spokesmen in a Board of Conference, in which the Commissioner will be represented by the General Superintendent, the Chief Clerk, one District Superintendent, one Section Foreman and one...
Page 27 - ... him, was too much to believe. There must, they thought, be some sinister motive behind it. Gradually, however, the better element among the men did believe in it, and as their faith grew stronger, the malcontents were either converted or thrust out, and slowly, but surely, the " Committee of 41 " became a body of earnest and honest co-operators with the Commissioner, toward the mutual confidence so essential for contentment on the part of the men, and without which the best results, from the...
Page 27 - ... and misled, into serious and embarrassing situations, those whose interests they were supposed to have at heart and to protect. " Aside from those identified by membership with these organizations, there were many, not members, who held a latent sympathy with the old system of settling differences by strikes. In fact, it was generally understood that wrongs must be either borne or righted by coercion. Arbitration was looked upon as a far-off theory, applicable, perhaps, at times, somewhere and...

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