Strengthening Peace in Post-Civil War States: Transforming Spoilers Into Stakeholders

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Matthew Hoddie, Caroline A. Hartzell
University of Chicago Press, Sep 30, 2010 - Political Science - 246 pages
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Among the more frequent and most devastating of conflicts, civil wars—from Yugoslavia to Congo—frequently reignite and even spill over into the international sphere. Given the inherent fragility of civil war peace agreements, innovative approaches must be taken to ensure the successful resolution of these conflicts. Strengthening Peace in Post–Civil War States provides both analytical frameworks and a series of critical case studies demonstrating the effectiveness of a range of strategies for keeping the peace.

Coeditors Matthew Hoddie and Caroline A. Hartzell here contend that lasting peace relies on aligning the self-interest of individuals and communities with the society-wide goal of ending war; if citizens and groups have a stake in peace, they will seek to maintain and defend it. The rest of the contributors explore two complementary approaches toward achieving this goal: restructuring domestic institutions and soft intervention. Some essays examine the first tactic, which involves reforming governments that failed to prevent war, while others discuss the second, an umbrella term for a number of non-military strategies for outside actors to assist in keeping the peace.

 

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Contents

1 Introduction
1
Restructuring Institutions
27
Part II Soft Intervention
121
List of Contributors
237
Index
239
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About the author (2010)

Matthew Hoddie is assistant professor of political science at Towson University. Caroline A. Hartzell is professor of political science at Gettysburg College. Together they are coauthors of Crafting Peace: Power-Sharing Institutions and the Negotiated Settlement of Civil Wars.

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