Stress and Hypertension: Examining the Relation between Psychological Stress and High Blood Pressure

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Yale University Press, Oct 1, 2008 - Health & Fitness - 416 pages
Does living a stress-filled life lead to elevated blood pressure? And if so, do strategies to better manage stress effectively lower blood pressure? In this authoritative and comprehensive book, Kevin T. Larkin examines more than a half-century of empirical evidence obtained to test the common assumption that stress is associated with the onset and maintenance of essential hypertension (high blood pressure).

While the research confirms that stress does play a role in the exacerbation of essential hypertension, numerous other factors must also be considered, among them obesity, exercise, and smoking, as well as demographic, constitutional, and psychological concerns. The author discusses the effectiveness of strategies developed to manage stress and thereby lower blood pressure and concludes with suggestions and directions for further study.

 

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I found this book extremely helpful. It covers every aspect of stress and its possible relationship to blood pressure regulation such as alpha vs beta adrenergic system, receptors, genes, and pathways to explain a rise in blood pressure.

Contents

The Case of Franklin
1
1 Regulation of Blood Pressure
7
2 Measurement of Blood Pressure
30
3 Models of Stress
67
4 Stress and Essential Hypertension
92
How Do Environmental Stressors Lead to Essential Hypertension?
127
Constitutional and Lifestyle Factors
181
Psychological and Social Factors
214
8 Treatment and Prevention of Essential Hypertension
257
9 Conclusions and Future Directions
307
References
323
Index
398
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