Structural Design in Wood

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Springer Science & Business Media, 1997 - Nature - 448 pages
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The prime purpose of this book is to serve as a design is of considerable value in helping the classroom text for the engineering or architec student make the transition from the often sim ture student. It will, however, also be useful to plistic classroom exercises to problems of the designers who are already familiar with design real world. Problems for solution by the student in other materials (steel, concrete, masonry) but follow the same idea. The first problems in each need to strengthen, refresh, or update their capa subject are the usual textbook-type problems, bility to do structural design in wood. Design but in most chapters these are followed by prob principles for various structural materials are lems requiring the student to make structural similar, but there are significant differences. planning decisions as well. The student may be This book shows what they are. required, given a load source, to find the magni The book has features that the authors believe tude of the applied loads and decide upon a set it apart from other books on wood structural grade of wood. Given a floor plan, the student design. One of these is an abundance of solved may be required to determine a layout of struc examples. Another is its treatment of loads. This tural members. The authors have used most of book will show how actual member loads are the problems in their classes, so the problems computed. The authors have found that students, have been tested.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
12 MATERIAL PROPERTIES
2
14 HYBRID CONSTRUCTION
8
16 NOTES TO STUDENTS Design Codes
9
REFERENCES
10
Wood Structure and Properties
11
24 CLASSIFICATION OF WOOD
12
25 WOOD STRUCTURE
14
Example 88
173
Example 89
174
Example 810
176
Example 811
179
Example 812
180
Example 813
181
811 TAPERED GLULAMS
184
Example 814
187

26 JUVENILE WOOD
17
29 MOISTURE CONTENT
18
210 SPECIFIC GRAVITY
20
211 TIMEDEPENDENT BEHAVIOR OF WOOD
21
212 STRENGTHREDUCING CHARACTERISTICS
22
213 THERMAL PROPERTIES OF WOOD
26
214 TESTS AND PROPERTIES OF INTEREST TO THE STRUCTURAL DESIGNER
27
REFERENCES
30
Production and Grading of Sawn Lumber
32
33 FINISH DESIGNATIONS
34
35 DRYING
36
36 LUMBER GRADING
37
38 DEFINITIONS
38
39 MODERN GRADING RULES
39
310 EXAMPLE OF VISUAL GRADING OF BEAMS AND STRINGERS
40
311 GRADING STAMPS
41
313 BOARD MEASURE
42
REFERENCES
43
Loads and Design Values
44
42 DEAD LOADS
45
Example 42
46
Example 43
47
43 VERTICAL LIVE LOADS
48
Example 44
49
Example 45
51
45 STABILITY UNDER WIND LOADS
53
46 LOAD COMBINATIONS
54
Example 410
55
47 SEISMIC LOADS
56
Part II Design Values
59
410 ADJUSTMENT FACTORS
60
411 TABLES FOR BASE DESIGN VALUES
62
Example 412
63
Example 414
64
Example 417
65
412 LOAD AND RESISTANCE FACTOR DESIGN
67
REFERENCES
69
ConnectionsNails Screws and Bolts
72
53 NAILS AND SPIKES
75
Example 51
77
Example 52
78
Example 54
79
Example 57
80
Example 58
83
Example 59
85
56 WOOD SCREWS
86
57 BOLTED CONNECTIONS Bolt Types
87
Example 511
89
Example 512
90
Example 515
91
58 CONNECTION DESIGN BY LRFD
92
Example 517
93
Example 518
94
Example 521
95
Selecting SawnTimber Beams
100
Example 61
103
Example 63
104
63 DESIGN FOR FLEXURE LATERALLY UNSUPPORTED BEAMS
105
Example 66
107
Example 67
108
Example 68
111
Example 69
112
65 DEFLECTION
114
Example 613
116
Example 615
117
66 DESIGN FOR BEARING PERPENDICULAR TO GRAIN
118
Example 617
119
Example 618
120
68 BEAM DESIGN BY LRFD
124
Example 622
125
Example 625
126
PROBLEMS
127
Selecting SawnTimber Compression and Tension Members
131
72 COLUMN DESIGN
132
Example 71
135
73 ROUND AND TAPERED COLUMNS
136
Example 74
137
74 SPACED COLUMNS
138
Example 77
140
75 BUILTUP COLUMNS
141
Example 78
142
Example 79
144
Example 711
145
Example 712
146
77 COLUMNS OR BEAMCOLUMNS WITH INITIAL CURVATURE
147
79 COMBINED TENSION AND BENDING
150
Example 714
151
Example 716
152
REFERENCES
153
Glued Laminated Members
157
82 ADVANTAGES OF GLULAMS OVER SAWN TIMBERS
158
Example 81
159
83 GLULAM PRODUCTION
160
84 STANDARD SIZES OF GLULAM
163
85 LIMITS OF CURVATURE
164
Example 82
166
87 SUGGESTED DESIGN PROCEDURE
167
Example 85
168
Example 86
169
88 BIAXIAL BENDING
170
Example 87
171
812 MEMBERS BOTH TAPERED AND CURVED
188
Example 815
189
814 GLULAM COLUMNS
194
815 GLULAM DESIGN BY LRFD
195
REFERENCES
196
Bolts Timber Connectors and Special Weldments
199
Example 91
201
92 CONNECTIONS WITH MOMENT BOLTS IN TENSION AND SHEAR
202
Example 92
203
93 STITCH BOLTS
204
95 SPECIAL WELDMENTS
206
Example 94
210
96 SHEAR PLATES AND SPLIT RINGS
212
97 SHEAR PLATES
214
Example 96
215
Example 97
216
99 SPIKED GRIDS AND GRID PLATES
218
910 NAILER PLATES AND TOOTHED PLATES
219
Timber Trusses
221
102 LIGHTFRAME TRUSSES ANALYSIS
224
Example 101
227
103 LIGHTFRAME TRUSSES MEMBER DESIGN
229
104 LIGHTFRAME TRUSSES CONNECTION DESIGN
231
Example 102
233
105 BRACING AND ERECTION OF LIGHTFRAME TRUSSES
236
106 HEAVYTIMBER TRUSSES
237
107 OLDSTYLE HEAVYTIMBER TRUSSES
238
Example 103
240
108 MODERN GUSSETED HEAVY TIMBER TRUSSES
242
109 TRUSSES CONNECTED BY SPLIT RINGS
244
1010 TRUSS DEFLECTIONS AND CAMBER
245
1011 TRUSS DESIGN BY LRFD
246
Example 104
247
REFERENCES
248
Plywood and Similar Wood Products
249
Example 111
254
Example 112
257
Example 113
258
Example 114
259
Example 118
260
Example 1110
261
Example 1112
263
117 FLOOR SHEATHING
264
119 LRFD FOR PLYWOOD
267
PROBLEMS
268
Diaphragm Action and Design
271
122 HORIZONTALDIAPHRAGM WEB DESIGN
273
123 HORIZONTALDIAPHRAGM CHORD DESIGN
277
Example 121
279
Example 122
280
Example 123
281
Example 125
282
Example 127
285
Example 128
286
125 ANCHORAGE OF SHEAR PANELS TO FOUNDATION
287
Example 129
290
Example 1211
291
Example 1212
292
127 WOOD DIAPHRAGM WITH MASONRY WALLS
293
128 PLYWOODSHEATHED METALSTUD SHEARWALLS
294
REFERENCES
295
BuiltUp and Composite Members
298
132 STRESSEDSKIN PANELS
301
Example 132
302
133 SANDWICH PANELS
304
Example 133
305
REFERENCES
306
Formwork for Concrete
308
143 DESIGN FORCES
309
144 TERMINOLOGY
310
145 WALL FORMWORK
311
146 FORMWORK FOR ROOF AND FLOOR SLABS
313
REFERENCES
314
Miscellaneous Structure Types
316
152 POLE BUILDINGS
319
Example 151
327
153 WOOD FOUNDATIONS
328
Example 152
333
154 TIMBER BRIDGES
336
155 BRIDGE DECK TYPES
340
156 BRIDGE DESIGN CRITERIA
343
Example 153
346
Example 154
350
Example 155
351
157 COMPOSITE DECKS
353
158 CONCLUSION
355
Wood Durability Protection and Preservation
358
162 PRESERVATIVE TREATMENT
364
163 NONPRESSURE TREATMENT METHODS
365
165 EFFECTIVENESS OF TREATMENT
366
166 USING PROPER DESIGN DETAILS TO PREVENT DECAY
367
167 TERMITE PROTECTION
370
168 FIRE DAMAGE
371
1610 EVALUATION AND REPAIR OF WOOD STRUCTURES
373
REFERENCES
374
Appendix A
377
Appendix B
384
Appendix C
420
Index
443
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