Studies of American Fungi: Mushrooms, Edible, Poisonous, Etc

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Andrus & Church, 1901 - Cookery (Mushrooms) - 322 pages
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Good photographs of mushrooms

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Page 299 - These are quickly dissolved by phallin, the blood serum escaping from the blood vessels into the alimentary canal, and the whole system being rapidly drained of its vitality. No bad taste warns the victim, nor do the preliminary symptoms begin until nine to fourteen hours after the poisonous mushrooms are eaten. There is then considerable abdominal pain and there may be cramps in the legs and other nervous phenomena, such as convulsions, and even lockjaw or other kinds of tetanic spasms. The pulse...
Page 44 - ... of the ink-cap. In wet weather this coprinus melts down into an inky fluid also, but in quite dry weather it remains more or less firm, and sometimes it does not deliquesce at all, but dries with all parts well preserved, though much shrunken of course as is the case with all the very fleshy fungi.
Page 36 - The brown scales so close together on the buttons are widely separated except at the top or center of the pileus, where they remain close together and form a broad cap resting jauntily on the shaggy head. This is shown in figure 85 which is from a photograph of three plants removed from the sod. A study of the different stages, which appear from the button stage to the mature plant, reveals the cause of this change in color and the wide separation of the dark brown scales. The threads of the outer...
Page 43 - ... the lower part of the stem, showing the delicate fibrous ring which is formed in the same way as in Coprinus atramentarius. The ring is much more delicate and is rarely seen except in very young specimens which are carefully collected and which have not been washed by rains. The mature plants are 8 cm. to 10 cm. high (3-4 inches), and the pileus varies from 2 cm. to 4 cm.
Page 35 - Now when every thing is ready in these fungus "buttons," the tiny cells already formed, as well as new ones still forming, expand rapidly and this pushes the mushroom up into view in a single night. In figure 84 are shown two buttons of the size when they are just ready to break through the soil. They are now quite dark 84.—" Buttons" of Coprinus; two in section, showing gill slits and hollow stem.
Page 36 - . (Natural size.) cease to grow, though they are firmly entangled with the inner layers. Now the threads underneath and all through the plant, in the gills and in the upper part of the stem grow and elongate rapidly. This pulls on the outer layer tearing it in the first place into small patches and causing them later to be more widely separated on the mature plant. Some of these scales remain quite large while others are torn up into quite small tufts. As the plant ages, the next inner layers of...
Page 40 - ... (figure 92). The stems are shorter than those of the shaggy-mane and the pileus is of a different shape and color. The pileus is more egg-shaped or oval. It varies in color from a silvery grey in a few forms to a dark ashen grey or smoky brown color in others. Sometimes the pileus is entirely smooth, as I have seen it in some of the silvery grey forms, where the delicate fibres coursing down in lines on the outer surface cast a beautiful silvery sheen in the light. Other forms present numerous...
Page 44 - ... diameter. The stem is quite slender and the pileus and gills quite thin as compared with the shaggy-mane and inkcap. The gills are not nearly so crowded as they are in the two other species. The pileus is tan color, or light buff, or yellowish brown. Except near the center it is marked with quite prominent striations which radiate to the margin. These striations are minute furrows or depressed lines, and form one of the characters of the species, being much more prominent than on the pileus of...
Page 40 - ... into large numbers of pointed tufts. In others, the delicate tufts cover more or less the entire surface, giving the plant a coarsely granular aspect. This is perhaps the more common appearance, at least so far as my observation goes. But not infrequently one finds forms which have the entire outer surface of the pileus torn into quite a large number of coarse scales, and these are often more prominent over the upper portion. Fine lines or striations mark also...
Page 36 - Here, too, the connection of the margin of the pileus with the stem is still shown. From our first study of mushrooms (Bulletin 138) we know that this connecting layer between the margin of the pileus and stem forms the veil. This kind of a veil is a marginal veil. The stem is hollow even at this young stage, and a slender cord of mycelium extends down the center of the tube thus formed as is shown in the sections. From the button stage the growth is quite rapid, and in a short while the plants are...

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